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Forsgren Gebring, Susanne
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Publications (6 of 6) Show all publications
Rejnö, Å., Nordin, P., Forsgren, S., Sundell, Y. & Rudolfsson, G. (2017). Nursing students’ attendance at learning activities in relation to attainment and passing courses: a prospective quantitative study. Nurse Education Today, 50(March), 36-41
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nursing students’ attendance at learning activities in relation to attainment and passing courses: a prospective quantitative study
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2017 (English)In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 50, no March, p. 36-41Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Students' motivation and ways of engaging in their schoolwork are important for their performance, including passing exams. Attendance at learning activities has also been argued to be of major importance, although no causal relationship with passing exams has been established in nursing education.

Objectives

The aim of this study was to describe the impact of attendance at nonmandatory learning activities on attainment, in terms of passing or failing of exams, in nursing education courses including both mandatory and non-mandatory activities.

Design

A prospective quantitative design.

Setting

The nursing education programme at a Swedish university.

Participants

Nursing students (n = 361) from two courses and four classes within the nursing programme.

Methods

Attendance was registered at every non-mandatory teaching activity by asking the students to note their attendance on a list. Data such as sex, age, and whether the students had passed the exam were also collected for each course and each semester separately.

Results

Increased participation was associated with an increasing proportion of students passing the exam. The chance of passing the exam increased by 13% for every additional learning occasion attended. Logistic regression showed an OR of 5.4 for an attendance of 100%.

Conclusions

An increase in attendance gave a higher proportion of exam passes. Encouraging students to attend non-mandatory learning activities could be of value, and potentially contribute to an increased graduation rate for nursing students.

Keywords
Attendance; Attainment; Examination pass; Nurse education; Prospective study
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-10419 (URN)10.1016/j.nedt.2016.11.025 (DOI)000393017300007 ()28012360 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85006790591 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-12-28 Created: 2016-12-28 Last updated: 2017-12-18Bibliographically approved
Rejnö, Å., Nordin, P., Forsgren Gebring, S. & Sundell, Y. (2016). Sjuksköterskestudenters närvaro vid läraktiviteter i relation till hur de klarar kursexaminationer. In: Kristina Johansson (Ed.), ViLär 8-9 december 2016, Vänersborg: . Paper presented at ViLär 8-9 december 2016 - en nationell konferens inom verksamhetsintegrerat lärande 2016, Vänersborg, Sweden.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sjuksköterskestudenters närvaro vid läraktiviteter i relation till hur de klarar kursexaminationer
2016 (Swedish)In: ViLär 8-9 december 2016, Vänersborg / [ed] Kristina Johansson, 2016Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Work Integrated Learning; NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-10426 (URN)
Conference
ViLär 8-9 december 2016 - en nationell konferens inom verksamhetsintegrerat lärande 2016, Vänersborg, Sweden
Available from: 2016-12-29 Created: 2016-12-29 Last updated: 2019-03-12Bibliographically approved
Forsgren Gebring, S., Christensson, T. & Hedemalm, A. (2014). Evaluation of the case method in nursing education. Nurse Education in Practice, 14(2), 164-169
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of the case method in nursing education
2014 (English)In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 164-169Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The case based learning (CBL) is a problem-based learning which engaging students and presenting them with learning-related and cognitive challenges. The purpose of the study was to elucidate nursing students experiences of the CBL as an educational tool in order to find out if it supports their learning. Qualitative content analysis was used and performed on the statements from nursing students’ course evaluations. Students perceived the CBL as an approach combining theory with practice which provides an overview of upcoming profession. Students gain adequate knowledge about patient care in reality and thereby enabling them to obtain a holistic understanding of patients health problems. Reflections related to case seminars widen students perspectives, improve their capacity for cooperation and help them to achieve long-lasting knowledge. This learning method offers nursing students an opportunity to enhance their judgment and critical thinking skills by applying theory in practice. Students gain adequate knowledge about patient care which may benefit patient care due to students acting professionally in their future role.

Keywords
Case study, case-based learning, nursing education, nursing process
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-5604 (URN)10.1016/j.nepr.2013.08.003 (DOI)24041633 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84897649813 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-09-18 Created: 2013-09-18 Last updated: 2019-05-10Bibliographically approved
Forsgren Gebring, S., Forsman, B. & Carlström, E. (2014). Working with Manchester triage: job satisfaction in nursing. In: International Emergency Nursing: Oral abstracts – 1st Global Conference on Emergency Nursing & Trauma Care: Dublin, Ireland, 18–21 September 2014. Paper presented at 1st Global Conference on Emergency Nursing & Trauma Care, 2014 (pp. 254-254). Elsevier, 22(4)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Working with Manchester triage: job satisfaction in nursing
2014 (English)In: International Emergency Nursing: Oral abstracts – 1st Global Conference on Emergency Nursing & Trauma Care: Dublin, Ireland, 18–21 September 2014, Elsevier, 2014, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 254-254Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Introduction: This study covers nurses' job satisfaction during triage at emergency departments in Western Sweden. Method: Data were collected from 74 triage nurses using a questionnaire containing 37 short form open questions. The answers were analysed descriptively and by measuring the covariance. Two open questions were analysed by content analysis. Results: The results showed a high degree of job satisfaction (88%). Triage as a method, the interesting nature of the work, and a certain freedom in connection with the triage tasks contributed to job satisfaction (R2 = 0.40). The nurses found their work interesting and stimulating, although some reported job dissatisfaction due to a heavy workload and lack of competence. Most of the nurses thought that Manchester Triage System (MTS) was a clear and straightforward method but in need of development. One result from the content analysis was difficulties in decision-making during the assessment of patients with multiple diseases. Since this patient group had increased in number, greater demands were placed on the nurses' competence. Conclusions: The rational modelling structure by which the triage method is constructed is unable to distinguish all the parameters that an experienced nurse takes into account. When the model is allowed to take precedence over experience, it can be of hindrance and contribute to certain estimates not corresponding with the patient's needs. The participants requested regular exercises solving and discussing patient scenarios, which can contribute to develop the instrument.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2014
National Category
Nursing Work Sciences
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-7206 (URN)10.1016/j.ienj.2014.08.006 (DOI)000347098200065 ()
Conference
1st Global Conference on Emergency Nursing & Trauma Care, 2014
Note

Oral abstract, nummer O18.1.

Available from: 2014-12-22 Created: 2014-12-18 Last updated: 2019-03-12Bibliographically approved
Forsman, B., Forsgren Gebring, S. & Carlström, E. (2012). Nurses working with Manchester triage: The impact of nursing experience on patient safety. Australasian Emergency Nursing Journal, 15(2), 100-107
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nurses working with Manchester triage: The impact of nursing experience on patient safety
2012 (English)In: Australasian Emergency Nursing Journal, ISSN 1574-6267, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 100-107Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

There is in Sweden an ongoing debate about the extent to which the practice of triage contributes to patient safety. This paper reports the findings of a study of nurses’ perceptions of the impact of experience and safety of the Manchester Triage System (MTS) within emergency departments in Western Sweden.

Methods

Data was collected from 74 triage nurses using a questionnaire containing 37 short form questions of Likert-type, analyzed descriptively and measured the covariance. Data was also collected with two open questions by using the critical incident technique and content analysis.

Results

The results described that the combination of the MTS method, the nurses’ experience and organizational factors accounted for 65% of patient safety. The study indicated that nurses’ experience contributed to higher patient safety than the model itself. A standardized assessment model, like MTS, can rarely capture all possible symptoms, as it will always be constrained by a limited number of keywords and taxonomies. It cannot completely replace the skills an experienced nurse develops over many years in the profession.

Conclusions

The present study highlights the value of triage nurse's experience. The participants considered experience to contribute to patient safety in emergency departments. A standardized triage model should be considered as additional support to the skills an experienced nurse develops.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2012
Keywords
Experience, Triage, Patient safety, Nursing, Sweden
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science; Work Integrated Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-4444 (URN)10.1016/j.aenj.2012.02.001 (DOI)2-s2.0-84860447775 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-06-21 Created: 2012-06-21 Last updated: 2019-04-30Bibliographically approved
Forsgren Gebring, S. & Forsman, B. (2012). Working with Manchester Triage-job satisfaction in nursing. In: Montreal 2012 International Biomedical & Nursing Forum, Sept 27-28, Program & Abstract Book: . Paper presented at Montreal 2012 International Nursing Conference, Sept 27-28 (pp. 1-1). Montreal
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Working with Manchester Triage-job satisfaction in nursing
2012 (English)In: Montreal 2012 International Biomedical & Nursing Forum, Sept 27-28, Program & Abstract Book, Montreal, 2012, p. 1-1Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Montreal: , 2012
Keywords
Manchester Triage, job satisfaction, nursing
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-4950 (URN)
Conference
Montreal 2012 International Nursing Conference, Sept 27-28
Available from: 2012-12-27 Created: 2012-12-27 Last updated: 2019-03-12Bibliographically approved
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