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Publications (6 of 6) Show all publications
Isaksson, C., Hiller, C. & Lane, A.-L. (2019). Active, passive, non-existing or conditional?: Social relations shaping energy use at workplaces. Energy Research & Social Science, 51, 148-155
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Active, passive, non-existing or conditional?: Social relations shaping energy use at workplaces
2019 (English)In: Energy Research & Social Science, ISSN 2214-6296, E-ISSN 2214-6326, Vol. 51, p. 148-155Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Energy efficiency concerns the entire workplace and a cooperative approach is important for achieving ambitious energy reduction targets. Despite this, many organisations still mainly regard energy efficiency as a technical issue involving just a few specialists. A focus on the social relations and processes that shape work on energy issues is lacking. The aim of this paper is to illuminate and explore social relations between the staff driving energy issues and their co-workers. The analysis presented is based upon two features shaping their mutual engagement for reducing energy use: the communication strategy on energy issues undertaken by the workplace and the support for energy efficiency and conservation among the staff. The study provides insights gained from an interview study done in a Swedish organisation as well as from social science research in the field. The result is a conceptual framework that describes four relationships between the drivers of change and their co-workers. These relationships are characterized as active, passive, non-existing and conditional engagement in energy efficiency and conservation. The framework can be used as a tool for identifying social constraints and possibilities for reducing the use of energy at workplaces as well as in other contexts. © 2019 Elsevier Ltd

Keywords
Energy efficiency, Energy conservation, Social potential, Social relations, Workplace
National Category
Energy Engineering Sociology
Research subject
SOCIAL SCIENCE, Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-13513 (URN)10.1016/j.erss.2018.12.014 (DOI)000465315300016 ()2-s2.0-85060531982 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funders: Göteborgs Energi

Available from: 2019-03-05 Created: 2019-03-05 Last updated: 2019-06-05Bibliographically approved
Björquist, E., Isaksson, C. & Tryggvason, N. (2019). Digitalt stöd för delaktighet: Ungas användning av digital teknik inom ramen för kommunernas LSS-verksamhet. Trollhättan: Högskolan Väst
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Digitalt stöd för delaktighet: Ungas användning av digital teknik inom ramen för kommunernas LSS-verksamhet
2019 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Trollhättan: Högskolan Väst, 2019. p. 24
Series
Rapport i korthet
Keywords
Digital delaktighet, ungdomar
National Category
Social Work
Research subject
Child and Youth studies; SOCIAL SCIENCE, Social work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-14004 (URN)
Available from: 2019-06-28 Created: 2019-06-28 Last updated: 2019-06-28Bibliographically approved
Isaksson, C. (2017). The neglected practice: uncertainties encountered by occupants in a new energy efficient building. In: eceee 2017 Summer Study proceedings: Consumption, efficiency and limits: . Paper presented at ECEEE 2017 SUMMER STUDY – CONSUMPTION, EFFICIENCY & LIMITS (pp. 1055-1062).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The neglected practice: uncertainties encountered by occupants in a new energy efficient building
2017 (English)In: eceee 2017 Summer Study proceedings: Consumption, efficiency and limits, 2017, p. 1055-1062Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Technical and performance related uncertainties that come with an increased number of components and system complexity are often thoroughly examined and tested in demonstration buildings. On the contrary, and despite the energy research literature stressing the importance to understand the requirements and context of the users, the uncertainties that occupants encounter while adapting to new energy efficient buildings are seldom examined and identified in depth.This paper will highlight the usefulness of seeing the technologies for buildings from the users' point of view. From a social practice perspective and the concept of domestication the paper examines various types of uncertainties encountered by occupants when managing technologies for buildings, such as bedrock heat pump, photovoltaic panels and LED-lighting, in a new energy efficient house.The result demonstrates that it is demanding and tiresome to tackle uncertainties and learn how to handle technologies for building, as well as to contact professionals for support. It might in fact be more convenient to "leave it as it is", with the consequences that no one is managing the technologies. Instead of assuming that carrying out this practice is straightforward, it would be better to work on an approach where this is not the case. In fact, the later approach creates much better conditions for extended learning and product development than the former.

Series
eceee 2017 Summer Study proceedings, ISSN 2001-7960
Keywords
energy efficiency gap, user perspective, socio-technical, energy use, social practices
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
SOCIAL SCIENCE, Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-11995 (URN)978-91-983878-1-0 (ISBN)
Conference
ECEEE 2017 SUMMER STUDY – CONSUMPTION, EFFICIENCY & LIMITS
Available from: 2018-01-10 Created: 2018-01-10 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Isaksson, C. & Ellegård, K. (2015). Anchoring energy efficiency information in households’ everyday projects: peoples’ understanding of renewable heating systems. Energy Efficiency, 8(2), 353-364
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anchoring energy efficiency information in households’ everyday projects: peoples’ understanding of renewable heating systems
2015 (English)In: Energy Efficiency, ISSN 1570-646X, E-ISSN 1570-6478, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 353-364Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article claims that the contents of energy conservation information policy instruments must be better adapted to household members’ everyday life experiences in order to capture their interest and transform information into action. The article elaborates on how to ground energy policy information in the everyday doings and strivings of households. Using two time-geographical concepts, i.e. activity and project, we investigate how people understand and define their energy-related activities as parts of overarching everyday projects with a focus on the constraints on energy conservation. The analysis is empirically based on interview data from a case study of households’ use of renewable heating technologies. The results illustrate how peoples’ heating activities are related to everyday projects such as reducing environmental impact, comfort for a convenient daily life, the household budget balance, learning about and/or maintaining home technologies and hobbies. One conclusion is that information instruments focusing solely on one or two such projects might hamper the translation from information to action and also limit the number of people interested in or able to access the information. Another conclusion is that the growing use of energy efficient technologies might influence new habits and perceptions of the everyday use of energy, making common economic motives for saving energy less useful. Anchoring energy-related information and support in the everyday activities and projects of households would facilitate the translation process. If this is achieved, information could prove a useful instrument in the broader reorganization of societal institutions in a sustainable direction.

Keywords
Energy use information, household context, time-geography, translation, renewable heating systems
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
SOCIAL SCIENCE, Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-7222 (URN)10.1007/s12053-014-9299-x (DOI)000351309600011 ()
Available from: 2014-12-22 Created: 2014-12-22 Last updated: 2019-05-14Bibliographically approved
Isaksson, C. & Ellegård, K. (2015). Dividing or sharing?: A time-geographical examination of eating, labour, and energy consumption in Sweden. Energy Research & Social Science, 10, 180-191
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dividing or sharing?: A time-geographical examination of eating, labour, and energy consumption in Sweden
2015 (English)In: Energy Research & Social Science, ISSN 2214-6296, E-ISSN 2214-6326, Vol. 10, p. 180-191Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Many energy consuming household activities are collectively organized, while in information campaigns for energy conservation they are regarded as planned and performed by individuals in isolation. This article aims at scrutinizing this mismatch by analytically examining how energy-consuming activities are allocated and organized among household members and explore the implications for energy consumption. Time-geographic concepts ground for the investigation and empirical illustrations are taken from a uniquely rich historic Swedish pilot study on time-use from 1996. The pilot offers time-diaries from members of the same households which allow analysis on activity allocation in the households. We present a conceptual framework with two overarching principles of activity allocation; project division and project sharing. Visualizations of daily activity sequences from time-diaries in the pilot study are used to analyze the household project providing meals. The overall result indicates that the ways households allocate and coordinate energy consuming activities matter to energy use. Consequently, it is important to consider the household with its members for understanding daily energy consuming activities and people’s possibilities to conserve energy. If reconfigured to fit into the interlinked everyday life activity sequences of household members, energy advice and information campaigns might improve the opportunities to reach their targets.

Keywords
Time geography, Energy conservation, Households, Division of labour
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
SOCIAL SCIENCE, Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-7965 (URN)10.1016/j.erss.2015.06.014 (DOI)2-s2.0-84939783364 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-08-24 Created: 2015-08-21 Last updated: 2019-05-14Bibliographically approved
Isaksson, C. (2014). Learning for lower energy consumption. International Journal of Consumer Studies, 38(1), 12-17
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Learning for lower energy consumption
2014 (English)In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 12-17Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Energy-efficient technologies are not just objects that might enable households to carry out more sustainable practices; they are tools, and using them effectively requires certain skills and knowledge. Households' difficulties in handling home heating and hot water technologies in particular have been highlighted as an obstacle to meeting energy conservation objectives. This has given rise to calls for improved support based on how the households define their activities and handle these technologies. By deploying a socio-cultural theory of learning and using in-depth interviews with households that have recently purchased renewable heating systems, this paper examines various situations in which people have learnt to use the technologies, and it discusses lessons learnt that may be useful for developing support. The results demonstrate three common learning approaches and identify situations where the learning process runs smoothly and where it does not. The conclusions suggest strategies for helping households overcome the resistance embedded in the interaction with the technologies, and they highlight the importance, when developing support, of starting with what creates meaning in various situations.

Keywords
Household, energy, technology, learning, appropriation
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
SOCIAL SCIENCE
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-5790 (URN)10.1111/ijcs.12045 (DOI)000329501300003 ()2-s2.0-84892368162 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-12-12 Created: 2013-12-12 Last updated: 2019-05-10Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4382-1215

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