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Publications (10 of 14) Show all publications
Alverbratt, C., Berlin, J., Åström, S., Kauffeldt, A. & Carlström, E. (2016). A New Working Method in Psychiatric Care: the impact of implementation. International Journal of Public Administration, 40(3), 295-304
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A New Working Method in Psychiatric Care: the impact of implementation
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2016 (English)In: International Journal of Public Administration, ISSN 0190-0692, E-ISSN 1532-4265, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 295-304Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

An equal mix of organizational cultures is important for a successful implementation process. The aim of this study was to examine the implementation of a new working method in psychiatric hospital wards, representing different cultural characteristics. Descriptive quantitative data were collected at two hospitals (intervention and control). The results revealed one ward characterized by a mix of organizational cultures. This ward, compared with other intervention wards, showed the best results regarding patient assessed empowerment and participation. The result shows tentatively that organizational culture may have an impact on the implementation processes.

Keywords
Empowerment, implementation, organizational culture, patient participation, psychiatric care
National Category
Nursing Psychiatry
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-7935 (URN)10.1080/01900692.2015.1072557 (DOI)000415696000007 ()2-s2.0-84962129556 (Scopus ID)
Note

Ingår i avhandling. Published online: 30 Mar 2016

Available from: 2015-08-19 Created: 2015-08-19 Last updated: 2019-02-05Bibliographically approved
Antonsson, H., Hällgren Graneheim, U., Isaksson, U., Åström, S. & Lundström, M. O. (2016). Evaluation of a Web-Based Training Program for Professional Carers Working With People With Learning Disabilities and Challenging Behavior: A Pilot Study with SSED-Design.. Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 37(10), 734-743
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of a Web-Based Training Program for Professional Carers Working With People With Learning Disabilities and Challenging Behavior: A Pilot Study with SSED-Design.
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2016 (English)In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 37, no 10, p. 734-743Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The interaction between people with intellectual disabilities and professional carers is often influenced by communicative difficulties contributing challenging behaviours. The aims of this study were to evaluate to a web-based training program aimed at improving carers' abilities to interact with people with learning disabilities who exhibit challenging behaviours and to explore carers' experiences of participating in such a program. A single-subject experimental design and mixed methods were used to integrate qualitative and quantitative data. Triangulation of questionnaires, interviews with carers, and assessments of one woman's behaviour was performed. The participants were professional carers aged 20 to 55 years. The web-based training program increased carers' abilities to handle challenging behaviours and decreased challenging behaviours in daily care. The program improved the opportunities to offer training to carers who work in community-based accommodations with limited time to receive training.

Keywords
Nursing, interaction, web-based training
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-9681 (URN)10.1080/01612840.2016.1189636 (DOI)000388504600005 ()27351080 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84976444762 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-12-16 Created: 2016-08-10 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Økland Lier, H., Åström, S. & Rørtveit, K. (2016). Patients’ daily life experiences five years after gastric bypass surgery – a qualitative study. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 25(3-4), 322-331
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patients’ daily life experiences five years after gastric bypass surgery – a qualitative study
2016 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 25, no 3-4, p. 322-331Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim and objective The objective was to explore and describe patients’ daily life experiences five years after gastric bypass surgery. Background Bariatric surgery markedly decreases body weight. Previous studies describe positive consequences, as well as physical, social and emotional challenges during the first few years after surgery. An understanding of how patients adjust to and cope with postsurgical changes in the long term is crucial to help them obtain a successful outcome after bariatric surgery. Method A qualitative method was employed. In-depth interviews with 10 men and women were conducted five years after bariatric surgery in a Norwegian hospital. Results One overarching theme – a multitude of daily life changes following bariatric surgery – was developed based on three main themes: relational aspects related to weight loss, the new body and changes in self-esteem. Six sub-themes are described. Conclusion Those who undergo gastric bypass surgery experience enormous changes in their daily lives. Their social lives, their relationship to their body and their self-esteem may be altered by the weight loss. Relevance to clinical practice The results of this study suggest directions for patient education, health staff education and peer education. A patient education programme focusing on changes in daily life experiences when undergoing gastric bypass surgery is suggested due to the changes experienced by the patients involved in this study.

Keywords
gastric bypass surgery, in-depth interviews, qualitative method, weight loss
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-8742 (URN)10.1111/jocn.13049 (DOI)000370637600005 ()26621613 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84955620912 (Scopus ID)
Note

Article first published online: 1 DEC 2015

Funders: Helse Vest,  Helse Fonna,  Stavanger University hospital 

Available from: 2015-12-02 Created: 2015-12-02 Last updated: 2019-02-11Bibliographically approved
Hällgren Graneheim, U. & Åström, S. (2016). Until Death Do Us Part: Adult Relatives' Experiences of Everyday Life Close to Persons with Mental Ill-Health. Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 37(8), 602-608
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Until Death Do Us Part: Adult Relatives' Experiences of Everyday Life Close to Persons with Mental Ill-Health
2016 (English)In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 37, no 8, p. 602-608Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study illuminates adult relatives' experiences of everyday life close to a person with mental ill-health. The study was based on nine diaries and four narrative interviews with relatives of people with mental ill-health. Data were subjected to qualitative content analysis. The participants experienced everyday life as a constant fight, for better and for worse, with psychiatric care. They were fighting for the mentally ill person's right to care; sometimes they felt resigned, but yet they had a confidence in the care. Their mission in life was to sacrifice themselves, meaning that they felt indispensable and became lonely and socially isolated. They considered their mission to last until death set them apart because they were keeping a family secret, and had great worries about the future. We conclude that relatives experience a two-folded stigma in living close to a person with mental ill-health and in becoming lonely and socially isolated.

National Category
Psychiatry Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-9682 (URN)10.1080/01612840.2016.1192707 (DOI)000382784800010 ()27327496 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84975256719 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-12-16 Created: 2016-08-10 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Norberg, M., Magnusson, E., Egberg Thyme, K., Åström, S., Lindh, J. & Öster, I. (2015). Breast Cancer Survivorship: Intersecting Gendered Discourses in a 5-Year Follow-Up Study. Health Care for Women International, 36(5), 617-633
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Breast Cancer Survivorship: Intersecting Gendered Discourses in a 5-Year Follow-Up Study
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2015 (English)In: Health Care for Women International, ISSN 0739-9332, E-ISSN 1096-4665, Vol. 36, no 5, p. 617-633Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this article the authors present a follow-up study of women's interview narratives about life 5 to 7 years after a breast cancer operation. The women had taken part in a study during the 6-month postoperation period. Art therapy contributed to well-being, including strengthening personal boundaries. In the new study, interview analysis informed by critical discursive psychology indicated three problematic discourses that the women still struggled with several years after the operation: the female survivor, the “good woman,” and individual responsibility. We concluded that many women with a history of breast cancer need support several years after their medical treatment is finished.

National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-7621 (URN)10.1080/07399332.2015.1017640 (DOI)2-s2.0-84929024034 (Scopus ID)
Note

Published online: 18 Feb 2015

Available from: 2015-05-30 Created: 2015-05-30 Last updated: 2019-02-19Bibliographically approved
Öster, I., Tavelin, B., Egberg Thyme, K., Magnusson, E., Isaksson, U., Lindh, J. & Åström, S. (2014). Art therapy during radiotherapy: A five-year follow-up study with women diagnosed with breast cancer. The arts in psychotherapy, 41(1), 36-40
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Art therapy during radiotherapy: A five-year follow-up study with women diagnosed with breast cancer
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2014 (English)In: The arts in psychotherapy, ISSN 0197-4556, E-ISSN 1873-5878, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 36-40Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Follow-up studies on art therapy are lacking. In a randomised art therapy intervention study from 2001 to 2004 with women with breast cancer, results showed that patients benefitted from participating in art therapy for up to four months after the intervention. The aim of this study was to describe the coping resources and quality of life amongst women treated for breast cancer five to seven years after participating in individual art therapy during radiotherapy as compared to a control group. In 2009, thirty-seven women, 18 from the intervention group and 19 from the control group, answered questionnaires about their coping resources and quality of life. The results showed no significant difference between the groups regarding their coping resources or quality of life, except for an unexpected significantly lower score in the domain ’Social relations’ in the study group as compared to baseline, at the time of the follow up. However, our study from 2001 to 2004 supports various positive effects of art therapy within six months of participation as compared to a control group. Consequently, attending art therapy during the treatment period for breast cancer can be of great importance to support health, coping and quality of life in a short-term perspective. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

Keywords
Art therapy, Breast cancer, Coping, Follow-up, Quality of life
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-5838 (URN)10.1016/j.aip.2013.10.003 (DOI)000332194400006 ()2-s2.0-84890051752 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-12-30 Created: 2013-12-30 Last updated: 2019-02-19Bibliographically approved
Johansson, C., Åström, S., Kauffeldt, A., Helldin, L. & Carlström, E. D. (2014). Culture as a predictor of resistance to change: A study of competing values in a psychiatric nursing context.. Health Policy, 114(2-3), 156-162
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Culture as a predictor of resistance to change: A study of competing values in a psychiatric nursing context.
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2014 (English)In: Health Policy, ISSN 0168-8510, E-ISSN 1872-6054, Vol. 114, no 2-3, p. 156-162Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It is well known that a conservative organizational culture can hinder the implementation of new organizational models. Prior to introducing something new it is important to identify the culture within the organization. This paper sets out to detect the feasibility of reform in a psychiatric clinic in a Swedish hospital prior to implementation of a new working method - a structured tool based on the International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health. A survey consisting of two instruments - an organizational values questionnaire (OVQ) and a resistance to change scale (RTC) - was distributed to registered and assistant nurses at the clinic. The association between the organizational subcultures and resistance to change was investigated with regression analysis. The results revealed that the dominating cultures in the outpatient centers and hospital wards were characterized by human relation properties such as flexibility, cohesion, belongingness, and trust. The mean resistance to change was low, but the subscale of cognitive rigidity was dominant, reflecting a tendency to avoid alternative ideas and perspectives. An instrument like the one employed in the study could be a useful tool for diagnosing the likelihood of extensive and costly interventions.

National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-5644 (URN)10.1016/j.healthpol.2013.07.014 (DOI)000331159300007 ()23932351 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84892680385 (Scopus ID)
Note

Available online 7 August 2013

Available from: 2013-10-17 Created: 2013-10-17 Last updated: 2019-05-10Bibliographically approved
Holm, A. L., Lyberg, A., Berggren, I., Åström, S. & Severinsson, E. (2014). Going around in a Circle: A Norwegian Study of Suicidal Experiences in Old Age. Nursing Research and Practice, Article ID 734635.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Going around in a Circle: A Norwegian Study of Suicidal Experiences in Old Age
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2014 (English)In: Nursing Research and Practice, ISSN 2090-1429, E-ISSN 2090-1437, article id 734635Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Depression has repeatedly been found to be a risk factor for completed suicide, particularly when coupled with a pervasive sense of hopelessness. The aim of this study was to evaluate depressed older persons’ suicidal experiences. Data were collected by means of individual in-depth interviews with nine informants living in two districts of Norway. A hermeneutic analysis was performed. Onemain theme: Going around in a circle and two themes: being alone without meaning in life and struggling to achieve reconciliation emerged from the analysis. An important implication for mental healthcare practice is the need to develop a person’s ability to shape and take control of her/his life. The healthcare organisation must be committed to a plan that sets out strategies enabling suicidal individuals to avoid the negative experience of meaninglessness. It was concluded that suicidal depressed elderly persons need helpto escape from their desperate situation. More research is urgently required in order to prevent suicide in depressed elderly persons whose emotional pain is unbearable.

Keywords
Suicide, old age, depression
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-7271 (URN)10.1155/2014/734635 (DOI)
Available from: 2015-01-12 Created: 2015-01-12 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Holm, A. L., Lyberg, A., Berggren, I., Åström, S. & Severinson, E. (2014). Social Capital and Depressive Ill-Health: An Evaluative Approach to the Implementation of the Chronic Care Model (CCM). Open Journal of Nursing, 4(10), 683-694
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social Capital and Depressive Ill-Health: An Evaluative Approach to the Implementation of the Chronic Care Model (CCM)
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2014 (English)In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 4, no 10, p. 683-694Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Social capital has been described as a person's sense of belonging as a result of the number and type of relationships she/he has, in which trust and reciprocity are especially important. Aim: To illuminate older persons' experiences of social capital and depressive ill-health after implementation of the CCM. Methods: Data were collected from nine participants resident in two districts of Norway by means of individual in-depth interviews. A qualitative hermeneutic analysis was performed. Results: Two overall themes, desire for a guardian and a wish for independence despite being dependent, and two themes emerging from the analysis. The first theme—searching for protection was based on three sub-themes overwhelmed by the emotional pain of other people, a sense of exclusion and worries about the future, while the second theme—the need for a relationship with trustworthy persons comprised two sub-themes, namely, emotional pain was not understood and powerlessness to change the situation. The result of this study highlights the need for greater understanding on the part of healthcare professionals of how older persons manage their social relationships. Healthcare professionals require more knowledge about how negative self-beliefs held by older persons suffering from emotional pain, which can lead to reduced ability to trust other people. Another consequence is that fear of being dependent on other people can result in unwillingness to admit the need for help. Conclusion: This study highlights the lack of social capital in older persons who suffer from depressive ill-health. The implementation of the CCM does not appear to improve the situation. Older persons need to be more aware of their social needs and productive interactions in order to protect themselves and obtain support from their social network.

Keywords
Chronic Care Model, Experiences, Depressive Ill-Health, Older Persons, Social Capital
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-6683 (URN)10.4236/ojn.2014.410073 (DOI)
Available from: 2014-09-16 Created: 2014-09-16 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Alverbratt, C., Carlström, E., Åström, S., Kauffeldt, A. & Berlin, J. (2014). The process of implementing a new working method - a project towards change in a Swedish psychiatric clinic. Journal of Hospital Administration, 3(6), 174-189
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The process of implementing a new working method - a project towards change in a Swedish psychiatric clinic
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2014 (English)In: Journal of Hospital Administration, ISSN 1927-6990, E-ISSN 1927-7008, Vol. 3, no 6, p. 174-189Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The implementation of evidence-based methods in hospital settings is difficult and complex. The aim of the present study was to highlight the implementation process concerning a new working method, i.e. a new assessment tool, based on the International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health (ICF), among psychiatric nursing staff on five participating wards at a Swedish county hospital. Descriptive, qualitative data were collected through focus group interviews pre- and post-implementation. Data were analysed using directed content analysis, guided by Normalization Process Theory (NPT). The results revealed that just one of the five participating wards met the criteria for a successful implementation process. The results confirm previous studies showing the difficulty of implementation. Although participants agreed with the intention of the model, they were reluctant to apply it in practice. The implementation process seemed to be influenced by factors such as: time pressure; heavy workload; stress; lack of routines in using the tool; lack of nursing staff; as well as cultural characteristics and resistance to change.

Keywords
Implementation, normalization process theory, psychiatric nursing, Sweden
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy Nursing Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified Public Administration Studies
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science; SOCIAL SCIENCE, Public administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-7002 (URN)10.5430/jha.v3n6p174 (DOI)
Available from: 2014-11-17 Created: 2014-11-17 Last updated: 2019-05-07Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6240-3559

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