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Publications (10 of 36) Show all publications
Pennbrant, S., Nunstedt, H. & Bernhardsson, L. (2019). Learning Through Reflection: The Portfolio Method As A Tool To Promote Work-Integrated Learning In Higher Education. In: L. Gómez Chova, A. López Martínez, I. Candel Torres (Ed.), INTED2019 Proceedings: . Paper presented at 13th International Technology, Education and Development Conference (pp. 729-739). Valencia: The International Academy of Technology, Education and Development
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Learning Through Reflection: The Portfolio Method As A Tool To Promote Work-Integrated Learning In Higher Education
2019 (English)In: INTED2019 Proceedings / [ed] L. Gómez Chova, A. López Martínez, I. Candel Torres, Valencia: The International Academy of Technology, Education and Development, 2019, p. 729-739Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Students need to develop meta-reflection to strengthen their learning process and to be able to manage the continuous changes encountered both higher education and in workplaces. Reflection is the most important for achieving progress within work integrated learning. For students to develop meta-reflection and achieve progression within work integrated learning, they need a systematic structure and conscious tools. The Portfolio method can be one of those tools.In this article we are going to discuss, from a theoretical standpoint, how teachers can develop a better structure for students so that they can strengthen their learning-process and progression of work integrated learning in higher education during internships which in turn promote lifelong learning. This progression of work integrated learning will be discussed in relation to the “WIL4U” model together with examples of reflection questions, learning outcomes, learning activities and examination forms. The “WIL4U” model was developed from the “AIL 4E (DUCATION)” model created by Bernhardsson, Gellerstedt and Svensson.The purpose of this conceptual discussion article is to highlight the portfolio method as a structure and tool for progress work integrated learning by reflection.With support of the portfolio method, the students can develop their ability to make well-balanced, and reflected choices in planning actions for work integrated learning. This requires well-developed self-regulation and the ability to meta-cognition and systematic meta-reflection to evaluate the effects of various actions. The portfolio method can also improve the reflection-process to develop the student's ability to emphasize strengths and increase the ability to achieve the learning outcomes in higher education.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Valencia: The International Academy of Technology, Education and Development, 2019
Keywords
lifelong learning, portfolio method, reflection, work integrated learning
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
Work Integrated Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-13770 (URN)10.21125/inted.2019.0257 (DOI)978-84-09-08619-1 (ISBN)
Conference
13th International Technology, Education and Development Conference
Available from: 2019-04-08 Created: 2019-04-08 Last updated: 2019-05-31Bibliographically approved
Pennbrant, S., Berg, A. & Johansson, L. F. (2019). Self-care experiences of older patients with diabetes mellitus: A qualitative systematic literature review. Nordic journal of nursing research
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-care experiences of older patients with diabetes mellitus: A qualitative systematic literature review
2019 (English)In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Diabetes is a growing health problem and risk increases with age. Self-care is an important part of treatment. The aim of this qualitative systematic literature review was to investigate how older patients with diabetes experience self-care. A systematic literature review relating to older patients, diabetes and self-care was conducted. Systematic searches were carried out in the CINAHL, PubMed/MEDLINE and PsycINFO databases. The results show that older patients with diabetes are mainly concerned with the issues of blood glucose testing, dietary requirements, information about diabetes, motivation and support. To support safe self-care for older patients with diabetes, nurses need opportunities to increase their knowledge and reflection about diabetes and safe self-care support. Further research is needed to identify how nurses can promote older patients’ self-care and quality of life in the context of a person-centred approach.

Keywords
diabetes, older patients, patient-centred care, self-care
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-14450 (URN)10.1177/2057158519868803 (DOI)
Note

First Published August 26, 2019

Available from: 2019-09-27 Created: 2019-09-27 Last updated: 2019-10-28Bibliographically approved
Johnsson, A., Wagman, P., Boman, Å. & Pennbrant, S. (2019). Striving to establish a care relationship-Mission possible or impossible?: Triad encounters between patients, relatives and nurses. Health Expectations
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Striving to establish a care relationship-Mission possible or impossible?: Triad encounters between patients, relatives and nurses
2019 (English)In: Health Expectations, ISSN 1369-6513, E-ISSN 1369-7625Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: When patients, relatives and nurses meet, they form a triad that can ensure a good care relationship. However, hospital environments are often stressful and limited time can negatively affect the care relationship, thus decreasing patient satisfaction.

OBJECTIVE: To explain the care relationship in triad encounters between patients, relatives and nurses at a department of medicine for older people.

DESIGN: A qualitative explorative study with an ethnographic approach guided by a sociocultural perspective.

METHOD: Participatory observations and informal field conversations with patients, relatives and nurses were carried out from October 2015-September 2016 and analysed together with field notes using ethnographic analysis.

RESULT: The result identifies a process where patients, relatives and nurses use different strategies for navigating before, during and after a triad encounter. The process is based on the following categories: orienting in time and space, contributing to a care relationship and forming a new point of view.

CONCLUSION: The result indicates that nurses, who are aware of the process and understand how to navigate between the different perspectives in triad encounters, can acknowledge both the patient's and relatives' stories, thus facilitating their ability to understand the information provided, ensure a quality care relationship and strengthen the patient's position in the health-care setting, therefore making the mission to establish a care relationship possible.

Keywords
care relationship, ethnography, nurses, older patient, relative, triad encounter
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-14582 (URN)10.1111/hex.12971 (DOI)31588667 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85073923765 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-10-14 Created: 2019-10-14 Last updated: 2019-11-05
Eriksson, M., Kerekes, N., Brink, P., Pennbrant, S. & Nunstedt, H. (2019). The level of sense of coherence among Swedish nursing staff. Journal of Advanced Nursing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The level of sense of coherence among Swedish nursing staff
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Aim To explore the level of sense of coherence among Swedish nursing staff.

Design: An explorative quantitative study design was adopted using a short form for measuring sense of coherence.

Methods Data were collected in January 2018 from nurses working in full‐time positions at two hospitals in Western Sweden. A total of 93 nurses completed the 13 item questionnaire measuring sense of coherence. Descriptive statistics were applied to obtain means and standard deviations. Spearman's rank correlation was used to describe strength of association between sense of coherence and socio‐demographic categories. Between‐group differences were defined using the nonparametric tests of Mann Whitney U test and Kruskal‐Wallis test.

Results The internal consistency of the SOC‐13 was low. An inter‐item‐correlation test indicated that two items decreased the internal consistency of the scale. The level of the three dimensions of sense of coherence varied; manageability was weakest and decreased the total sense of coherence. The meaningfulness dimension was as strongest.

Conclusion On a national level, nurses reported weaker SOC than the general population, but stronger in an international comparison of nurses. They found their work difficult to manage, but meaningful.

Impact On a national level, the nurses report weaker SOC than the general population, but stronger in an international comparison of nurses. Findings from this study will have an impact on how nurses can manage work related stress in terms of sense of coherence. There will also be an impact on nurses' well‐being, which in a long run benefits patients.

Keywords
nurse, nursing, sense of coherence, salutogenesis, manageability, comprehensibility, meaningfulness, psychometric properties, nursing staff, hospital settings.
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-13998 (URN)10.1111/jan.14137 (DOI)000479609700001 ()31236952 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85070260286 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Framgångsfaktorer för hållbart arbetsliv för sjuksköterskor
Available from: 2019-06-26 Created: 2019-06-26 Last updated: 2019-10-16Bibliographically approved
Pennbrant, S., Gustafsson Törn, J. & Munthe, H. (2018). Information about sexual activity after hip replacement: A literature review. Nordic journal of nursing research, 38(3), 119-127
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Information about sexual activity after hip replacement: A literature review
2018 (English)In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 119-127Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sexual activity is an important aspect of quality of life and contributes to healing and recovery. Adequate information may minimize post-operative risks and improve wellbeing. The aim of this literature review was to identify and review articles regarding the information on sexual activity after hip replacement provided to or obtained by patients and partners prior to their hip replacement surgery. The literature search was performed in the following databases: CINAHL, PubMed/Medline, MEDLINE (via Ebscoost) and Scopus. The results underline the importance of providing hip replacement patients and partners with relevant information, to reduce their concerns and improve their satisfaction and quality of life. Such information could promote person-centered care for patient and partner, and increase long-term cost-effectiveness for the healthcare organization. Information to patients and partners on post-hip-replacement sexual limitations has not been closely studied. Further research is needed to help healthcare providers promote patients’ and partners’ sexual health and quality of life and improve wellbeing.

Keywords
hip replacement, information, partner, person-centered care, sexual activity
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-11229 (URN)10.1177/2057158517718397 (DOI)
Note

Författarversionen i fulltext

Available from: 2017-07-14 Created: 2017-07-14 Last updated: 2019-06-11Bibliographically approved
Pennbrant, S. & Svensson, L. (2018). Nursing and learning: healthcare pedagogics and work-integrated learning. Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning, 8(2), 179-194
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nursing and learning: healthcare pedagogics and work-integrated learning
2018 (English)In: Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning, ISSN 2042-3896, E-ISSN 2042-390X, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 179-194Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose The purpose of this paper is twofold: to describe work-integrated learning (WIL) related to healthcare pedagogics, and to describe the distinctive aspects of research on WIL with specialization in healthcare pedagogics. Design/methodology/approach The general purpose of this theoretical paper is to define and formulate a research agenda within WIL with specialization in healthcare pedagogics. Findings WIL with specialization in healthcare pedagogics is a multidisciplinary field of knowledge encompassing education, health sciences and social sciences, and focuses on research and knowledge-creation involving nursing schools in higher education, healthcare organizations and the surrounding community. Originality/value The starting point of the research environment is the ambition to gain knowledge about the conditions, processes and outcomes in healthcare education and healthcare organizations, both individually and collectively, intra- and inter-professionally, in the perspective of life-long learning. WIL with specialization in healthcare pedagogics is a research area that can carry out important research in healthcare education and healthcare organization and, thus, contribute to high-quality care meeting current and future needs.

Keywords
Healthcare organization, Healthcare pedagogics, Higher education, Multidisciplinary, Research, Work-integrated learning
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
SOCIAL SCIENCE, Informatics; NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science; Work Integrated Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-12250 (URN)10.1108/HESWBL-08-2017-0048 (DOI)000432183700007 ()2-s2.0-85044711881 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-04-10 Created: 2018-04-10 Last updated: 2019-02-05Bibliographically approved
Johnsson, A., Boman, Å., Wagman, P. & Pennbrant, S. (2018). Voices used by nurses when communicating with patients and relatives in a department of medicine for older people: An ethnographic study. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 27(7-8), E1640-E1650
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Voices used by nurses when communicating with patients and relatives in a department of medicine for older people: An ethnographic study
2018 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, no 7-8, p. E1640-E1650Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: To describe how nurses communicate with older patients and their relatives in a department of medicine for older people in western Sweden.

BACKGROUND: Communication is an essential tool for nurses when working with older patients and their relatives but often patients and relatives experience shortcomings in the communication exchanges. They may not receive information or are not treated in a professional way. Good communication can facilitate the development of a positive meeting and improve the patient's health outcome.

DESIGN: An ethnographic design informed by the sociocultural perspective was applied.

METHOD: Forty participatory observations were conducted and analyzed during the period October 2015 to September 2016. The observations covered 135 hours of nurse-patient-relative interaction. Field notes were taken and 40 informal field conversations with nurses and 40 with patients and relatives were carried out. Semi-structured follow-up interviews were conducted with five nurses.

RESULTS: In the result, it was found that nurses communicate with four different voices: a medical voice described as being incomplete, task-oriented and with a disease perspective; a nursing voice described as being confirmatory, process-oriented and with a holistic perspective; a pedagogical voice described as being contextualized, comprehension-oriented and with a learning perspective; and a power voice described as being distancing and excluding. The voices can be seen as context-dependent communication approaches. When nurses switch between the voices this indicates a shift in the orientation or situation.

CONCLUSION: The results indicate that if nurses successfully combine the voices, while limiting the use of the power voice, the communication exchanges can become a more positive experience for all parties involved and a good nurse-patient-relative communication exchange can be achieved.

RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Working for improved communication between nurses, patients and relatives is crucial for establishing a positive nurse-patient-relative relationship, which is a basis for improving patient care and healthcare outcomes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Keywords
communication, ethnography, nurses’ voices, older patient, relative, sociocultural perspective
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-12202 (URN)10.1111/jocn.14316 (DOI)000430825100036 ()29493834 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85045891204 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-03-07 Created: 2018-03-07 Last updated: 2018-09-14Bibliographically approved
Johnsson, A., Wagman, P., Boman, Å. & Pennbrant, S. (2018). What are they talking about? Content of the communication exchanges between nurses, patients and relatives in a department of medicine for older people: An ethnographic study. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 27(7-8), E1651-E1659
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What are they talking about? Content of the communication exchanges between nurses, patients and relatives in a department of medicine for older people: An ethnographic study
2018 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, no 7-8, p. E1651-E1659Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore and describe the content of the communication exchanges between nurses, patients and their relatives in a department of medicine for older people in western Sweden.

BACKGROUND: Information, messages and knowledge are constantly being communicated between nurses, older patients and relatives in the healthcare sector. The quality of communication between them has a major influence on patient outcomes. A prerequisite for good care to be given and received is that there is mutual understanding between the parties involved.

DESIGN: An ethnographic study was informed by a sociocultural perspective.

METHOD: Data were collected through 40 participatory observations of meetings between nurses and older patients and/or relatives which covered 135 hours of nurse-patient-relative interaction, field notes, 40 field conversations with 24 nurses and 40 field conversations with patients (n=40) and relatives (n=26). Five semi-structured interviews were conducted with nurses. An ethnographic analysis was performed.

RESULTS: The analysis identified three categories of content of the communication exchanges: medical content focusing on the patient's medical condition, personal content focusing on the patient's life story, and explanatory content focusing on the patient's health and nursing needs. The content is influenced by the situation and context.

CONCLUSIONS: Nurses would benefit from more awareness and understanding of the importance of the communication content and of the value of asking the didactic questions (how, when, what and why) in order to improve the patients' and relatives' understanding of the information exchanges and to increase patient safety.

RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Nurses can use the communication content to create conditions enabling them to obtain a holistic view of the patient's life history and to develop an appropriate person-centered care plan. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Keywords
communication content, ethnography, nurses, older patient, person-centered care, relative, sociocultural perspective
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-12201 (URN)10.1111/jocn.14315 (DOI)000430825100037 ()29493840 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85045879016 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-03-07 Created: 2018-03-07 Last updated: 2018-09-14Bibliographically approved
Pennbrant, S. & Hansen, K. (2017). District nurses meeting with and providing care to people with mental illness in health centers: An interview study. Clinical Nursing Studies, 5(4), 96-104
Open this publication in new window or tab >>District nurses meeting with and providing care to people with mental illness in health centers: An interview study
2017 (English)In: Clinical Nursing Studies, ISSN 2324-7940, E-ISSN 2324-7959, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 96-104Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: Primary healthcare is facing increasing numbers of people with mental illness. Although district nurses are expected to promote health and prevent illness, most health centers in Western Sweden have no psychiatric nurses. The aim of this study was to explore how district nurses experience meeting with and providing care to patients with mental illness in health centers. Methods: Eight individual, semi-structured interviews with district nurses working in health centers were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results: The district nurses felt that it is challenging to meet with patients with mental illness and that they need to learn to master such situations better. In particular, interaction challenge when assessing the patient’s mental care needs, the dialogue challenge when attempting to achieve the patient’s trust, and the competence challenge when trying to determine correct and safe care for the patient. Conclusions: District nurses would benefit from having specific guidelines on how to provide person-centered care to patients with mental illness. Such guidelines would help district nurses in their planning and facilitating meetings with patients with mental illness and in their efforts to find solutions adapted to the specific patient, thus increasing both the district nurses’ feelings of adequacy and the patient’s feelings of safety and trust.

Keywords
District nurse, Health centers, Nursing, People with mental illness, Person-centered care, Qualitative content
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-11751 (URN)10.5430/cns.v5n4p96 (DOI)
Projects
-
Note

Online Published: October 12, 2017

Available from: 2017-10-13 Created: 2017-10-13 Last updated: 2019-05-21Bibliographically approved
Dahlborg Lyckhage, E., Pennbrant, S. & Boman, Å. (2017). Health care systems in transition: Equality, access and health literacy in three Scandinavian welfare states.: “The Emperor’s new clothes”: discourse analysis on how the patient is constructed in the new Swedish Patient Act. In: : . Paper presented at COMMUNICATION, MEDICINE & ETHICS (COMET) June 26-28, 2017, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA Campus of Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis (IUPUI).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health care systems in transition: Equality, access and health literacy in three Scandinavian welfare states.: “The Emperor’s new clothes”: discourse analysis on how the patient is constructed in the new Swedish Patient Act
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The Swedish welfare debate increasingly focuses on market liberal notions and its healthcare perspective aims for more patient-centered care. This article examines the new Swedish Patient Act describing and analyzing how the patient is constructed in government documents. This study takes a Foucauldian discourse analysis approach following Willig’s analysis guide. The act contains an entitlement discourse for patients and a requirement discourse for healthcare personnel. These two discourses are governed by a values-based healthcare discourse. Neo-liberal ideology, in the form of New Public Management discourse, focusing on the value of efficiency and competition, is given a hegemonic position as laws and regulations are used to strengthen it. The new Swedish Patient Act seems to further strengthen this development. The Act underlines the increased entitlement for patients, but it is not legally binding as it offers patients only indirect entitlement to influence and control their care. To safeguard the patient’s entitlement under the Patient Act, healthcare personnel should be made aware of the contents of the Act, so that they can contribute to the creation of systems and working methods that facilitate respect of the Act’s provisions in daily healthcare work.

Keywords
discourse analysis, healthcare, patient-centered care, swedish patient act
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-11230 (URN)
Conference
COMMUNICATION, MEDICINE & ETHICS (COMET) June 26-28, 2017, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA Campus of Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis (IUPUI)
Available from: 2017-07-14 Created: 2017-07-14 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2793-9937

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