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Publications (10 of 14) Show all publications
Jobe, W., Nilsson, S., Bernhardsson, P. & Rask, A. B. (2018). Improving the creation, curation and discovery of open educational resources for work integrated and lifelong learning. In: : . Paper presented at ICELW: The 11th Annual International Conference on E-Learning in the Workplace, 2018. , Article ID 2440743862.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Improving the creation, curation and discovery of open educational resources for work integrated and lifelong learning
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This paper concerns open education (OER) resources, and more specifically the process of publishing OER material to make it easier to find on the web. The overarching goals are to improve the creation and discovery of OER material for workplace learning as well as strive towards UNESCO’s Sustainable Development Goal 4, which aims to ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all. As we see it, there are two key challenges. The first challenge regards the content creation and curation side; i.e. the process of making OER material available to the general public, how to maintain the resource and how to get feedback on it. The second challenge regards discovery i.e. for OER consumers to easily find OER material and discern its usefulness in their specific learning context. We are in the process of developing a web based system that aids content creators in publishing and maintaining their OER material. The system helps the content creator by generating semantic metadata about the resource based on the Dublin Core system and creates a package of the material itself along with said metadata in a search engine optimized HTML5 file, ready for publishing on a web server or a video streaming site like YouTube, or other media sharing sites. This approach primarily utilizes common search engines to find the material, thus making the OER material decentralized and not necessarily specific to a specific OER repository. The metadata created by the system does, however, enable developers to create systems specialized in collecting and aggregating OER material, further enhancing the capability of the decentralized ecosystem of OER resources to be used by learning management systems. The key contribution is a suggestion as to how to automatically generate and use an OERID so that all resources can be discovered, curated, and reused.

Keywords
didactics, virtual learning, organization theory, differentiated instruction, Managers and employees in public institutions, Managers and employees in private companies
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Research subject
SOCIAL SCIENCE, Informatics; Work Integrated Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-13076 (URN)
Conference
ICELW: The 11th Annual International Conference on E-Learning in the Workplace, 2018
Available from: 2018-10-31 Created: 2018-10-31 Last updated: 2018-11-07Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, S., Svensson, L. & Jobe, W. (2017). Supporting nomadic work- and study practices in groupware design. In: Jon Dron; Sanjaya Mishra (Ed.), Proceedings on E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, Oct 17, 2017 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Paper presented at E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, Oct 17, 2017 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada (pp. 822-826). Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Supporting nomadic work- and study practices in groupware design
2017 (English)In: Proceedings on E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, Oct 17, 2017 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada / [ed] Jon Dron; Sanjaya Mishra, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education, 2017, p. 822-826Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This brief paper concerns the design of real-time collaborative systems adhering to a nomadic work- and study practice. Nomadic practices can be characterized as having a heterogeneous workplace, working or studying from different locations during a day. This practice has been enabled by advances in technology and formed by human behavior. This means that we now must consider this type of work when designing collaboration software. This brief paper outlines some major issues concerning technology-mediated collaboration arising from nomadic work practices; different network conditions, data cost and device heterogeneity, and proposes tentative design ideas addressing these issues.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education, 2017
Keywords
Workplace learning, groupware design
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects Learning
Research subject
Work Integrated Learning; SOCIAL SCIENCE, Informatics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-13372 (URN)978-1-939797-31-5 (ISBN)
Conference
E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, Oct 17, 2017 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Available from: 2019-01-07 Created: 2019-01-07 Last updated: 2019-01-07Bibliographically approved
Aghaee, N., Jobe, W., Karunaratne, T., Smedberg, Å., Hansson, H. & Tedre, M. (2016). Interaction Gaps in PhD Education and ICT as a Way Forward: Results from a Study in Sweden. International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, 17(3), 360-383
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interaction Gaps in PhD Education and ICT as a Way Forward: Results from a Study in Sweden
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2016 (English)In: International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, ISSN 1492-3831, E-ISSN 1492-3831, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 360-383Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Many research studies have highlighted the low completion rate and slow progress in PhD education. Universities strive to improve throughput and quality in their PhD education programs. In this study, the perceived problems of PhD education are investigated from PhD students' points of view, and how an Information and Communication Technology Support System (ICTSS) may alleviate these problems. Data were collected through an online open questionnaire sent to the PhD students at the Department of (the institution's name has been removed during the double-blind review) with a 59% response rate. The results revealed a number of problems in the PhD education and highlighted how online technology can support PhD education and facilitate interaction and communication, affect the PhD students' satisfaction, and have positive impacts on PhD students' stress. A system was prototyped, in order to facilitate different types of online interaction through accessing a set of online and structured resources and specific communication channels. Although the number of informants was not large, the result of the study provided some rudimentary ideas that refer to interaction problems and how an online ICTSS may facilitate PhD education by providing distance and collaborative learning, and PhD students' self-managed communication.

Keywords
PhD education, information and communication technology (ICT), support system, interaction, peer communication
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Research subject
SOCIAL SCIENCE, Informatics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-9005 (URN)10.19173/irrodl.v17i3.2220 (DOI)000380035900021 ()2-s2.0-84969249047 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-02-05 Created: 2016-02-05 Last updated: 2019-05-20Bibliographically approved
Jobe, W. (2015). Bridging the learning gap in Kenya with mobile learning: Challenges and future strategies. In: curtis Ho & Grace Lin, University of Hawaii, USA (Ed.), Proceedings of E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2015. Paper presented at Proceedings of E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2015 (pp. 1319-1325). Chesapeake, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bridging the learning gap in Kenya with mobile learning: Challenges and future strategies
2015 (English)In: Proceedings of E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2015 / [ed] curtis Ho & Grace Lin, University of Hawaii, USA, Chesapeake, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education, 2015, p. 1319-1325Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The overarching aim of this research was to study how mobile technology can catalyze informal learning and bridge the gap between informal and non-formal learning. In this study 30 Kenyan elite runners were equipped with a simple Android smartphone and free Internet for one year. The original research project focused on studying how a smartphone in the hands of impoverished Kenyans could assist and enhance informal learning. This project used log data, workshops and interviews to track the users’ progress. During the course of the study a huge desire for more formalized learning developed. Thus, a non-formal course on Human Rights was developed and made available for all Kenyans via any Internet connected device. In this way the intersection of these two projects provided an opportunity to satiate interests gained from unguided informal learning with structured non-formal learning. Key findings were that the smartphone empowered marginalized groups, augmented informal learning opportunities, and provided a means to bridge informal and non-formal learning to deliver educational opportunities to any device in the form of a non-formal MOOC. This research made a significant impact in the participants’ lives and the most common statement from the interviews was the statement “it helps us a lot”.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Chesapeake, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education, 2015
Keywords
Mobile learning, Kenya, e-learning
National Category
Information Systems Information Systems, Social aspects
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-8640 (URN)978-1-939797-20-9 (ISBN)
Conference
Proceedings of E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2015
Available from: 2015-11-12 Created: 2015-11-12 Last updated: 2019-03-13Bibliographically approved
Aghaee, N., Karunaratne, T., Smedberg, Å. & Jobe, W. (2015). Communication and Collaboration Gaps among PhD Students and ICT as a Way Forward: Results from a Study in Sweden. In: : . Paper presented at Proceedings of E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2015 (pp. 237-244). Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Communication and Collaboration Gaps among PhD Students and ICT as a Way Forward: Results from a Study in Sweden
2015 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The low completion rate and slow progress in PhD education have been highlighted in many studies. However, the interaction problems and communication gaps that PhD students encounter make this attempt even more challenging. The aim of this study is to investigate the peer interaction problems and ICT based solutions from PhD students’ perspectives. The data collection method was an online questionnaire and in-depth interviews were used to follow up. The target group for the survey was the PhD students in Computer Science at Stockholm University. The total number of respondents for the survey was 53 PhD students and eleven randomly selected PhD students for the interviews. The results reflected a lack of peer interaction as an important issue in the perspective of the students. Based on this, the study showed several ICT solutions that have the potential to reduce the interaction problems and thereby improve PhD students’ collaborative learning and research quality.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education, 2015
Keywords
PhD students, communication, collaboration
National Category
Information Systems
Research subject
SOCIAL SCIENCE, Informatics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-8641 (URN)
Conference
Proceedings of E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2015
Available from: 2015-11-12 Created: 2015-11-12 Last updated: 2019-03-13Bibliographically approved
Jobe, W. (2014). Do-It-Yourself Learning in Kenya: Exploring mobile technologies for merging non-formal and informal learning. (Doctoral dissertation). Stockholm: Department of Computer and Systems Sciences, Stockholm University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Do-It-Yourself Learning in Kenya: Exploring mobile technologies for merging non-formal and informal learning
2014 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The educational landscape is changing and a variety of technologies and techniques are blurring the lines between traditional and non-traditional learning. This change is substantial in low-income countries: individuals in developing countries have a great desire to educate themselves and improve their quality of life. Kenyans are adequately literate and accustomed to mobile technology despite being a largely impoverished, poorly educated populace. Kenya represents an optimal setting in which to research the use and feasibility of modern mobile and educational technologies. The broad aim of this dissertation is to explore how mobile devices can catalyze and enhance both informal and non-formal learning. In particular, this dissertation explores how technologies and concepts such as mobile web apps, Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), and learning incentives via a smartphone specifically affect informal and non-formal learning in Kenya. The primary research question is how can learning efforts that utilize mobile learning, MOOCs, and learning incentives combine non-formal and informal learning to develop and contribute to a do-it-yourself (DIY) approach to learning in Kenya? The primary method is action research. The first contribution of this dissertation is the finding that mobile web apps are currently better suited for data exchange than producing new content. The second contribution is the finding that a smartphone can enhance informal learning in a developing country with little or no scaffolding. The third contribution is the finding that non-formal learning efforts as a MOOC are shown to be a viable means of delivering non-formal learning in a developing country via a smartphone. The fourth contribution is the finding that the use of incentives such as digital badges provide a means by which to validate non-formal learning and contribute to a DIY attitude towards learning creation, where individuals can freely complement or replace a traditional curriculum.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Department of Computer and Systems Sciences, Stockholm University, 2014. p. 122
Series
eport Series / Department of Computer & Systems Sciences, ISSN 1101-8526 ; 14-018
Keywords
ICT4D, mobile learning, M4D, informal learning, non-formal learning, MOOCs, digital incentives
National Category
Information Systems
Research subject
SOCIAL SCIENCE, Informatics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-7216 (URN)978-91-7649-045-7 (ISBN)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2014-12-19 Created: 2014-12-19 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Östlund, C., Jobe, W. & Svensson, L. (2014). E-training through web lectures. In: M. Searson & M. Ochoa (Ed.), Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2014: . Paper presented at Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, Mar 17, 2014 in Jacksonville, Florida, United States (pp. 397-402). Chesapeake, VA: AACE
Open this publication in new window or tab >>E-training through web lectures
2014 (English)In: Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2014 / [ed] M. Searson & M. Ochoa, Chesapeake, VA: AACE , 2014, p. 397-402Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper sets out to inform how technology can be designed to support formal workplace training by acknowledging the context of every day work. The research in this paper follows the approach of design science research and a design theory for e-training through web lectures emerged in collaboration with members of the county administration through four designcycles of problem awareness: conceptual suggestion, system development, and evaluation. Aframework called authentic e-learning with nine design principles was chosen as a kernel theory.The design principles were then evaluated in the context of workplace learning and after four design cycles some of the original design principles was still unaltered, some was adapted to the conditions of workplace learning and new principles emerged from the evaluation process.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Chesapeake, VA: AACE, 2014
Keywords
Web lectures, design science, workplace learning, Work-integrated Learning, WIL, AIL
National Category
Information Systems Pedagogical Work
Research subject
Work Integrated Learning; SOCIAL SCIENCE, Informatics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-7190 (URN)978-1-939797-07-0 (ISBN)
Conference
Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, Mar 17, 2014 in Jacksonville, Florida, United States
Available from: 2014-12-17 Created: 2014-12-17 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Hansson, P.-O. & Jobe, W. (2014). Frontrunners in ICT: Kenyan runners'€™ improvement in training, informal learning and economic opportunities using smartphones. ijEDict - International Journal of Education and Development using Information and Communication Technology, 10(4)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Frontrunners in ICT: Kenyan runners'€™ improvement in training, informal learning and economic opportunities using smartphones
2014 (English)In: ijEDict - International Journal of Education and Development using Information and Communication Technology, ISSN 1814-0556, E-ISSN 1814-0556, Vol. 10, no 4Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Keywords
Kenya, informatik, informal learning, smartphones
National Category
Information Systems
Research subject
SOCIAL SCIENCE, Informatics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-7210 (URN)
Available from: 2014-12-19 Created: 2014-12-19 Last updated: 2018-04-10Bibliographically approved
Jobe, W., Östlund, C. & Svensson, L. (2014). MOOCs for Professional Teacher Development. In: M. Searson & M. Ochoa (Ed.), Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2014: . Paper presented at Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, Mar 17, 2014 in Jacksonville, Florida, United States (pp. 1580-1586). Chesapeake, VA: AACE
Open this publication in new window or tab >>MOOCs for Professional Teacher Development
2014 (English)In: Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2014 / [ed] M. Searson & M. Ochoa, Chesapeake, VA: AACE , 2014, p. 1580-1586Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

A MOOC is a trending concept in education that is disrupting traditional methods oflearning consumption. The emergence and use of MOOCs for professional teacher development isstill uncommon, but on the verge of gaining a foothold. Research regarding MOOCs typicallyfocuses on impacts for higher education and lifelong learning. However, the specific intersection ofMOOCs and professional teacher development is poorly researched. This concept papercontemplates the benefits and drawbacks of using MOOCs for professional teacher developmentand calls for more practical studies and explorative research. This paper also speculates on the basicMOOC design criteria and principles needed to maximize engagement and course completion,which are currently common issues with general MOOCs. The conclusion is that MOOCs can be acost- and resource-effective means to deliver quality education in order to further professionalteacher development. However, possible risks are employers' reluctance to accept MOOCaccreditation as equivalent professional development and the lack of relevant MOOC courses forprofessional development.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Chesapeake, VA: AACE, 2014
Keywords
MOOC, Professional Teacher Development, Lifelong Learning, WIL, Work-integrated Learning, AIL
National Category
Pedagogical Work Information Systems
Research subject
Work Integrated Learning; SOCIAL SCIENCE, Informatics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-7188 (URN)978-1-939797-07-0 (ISBN)
Conference
Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, Mar 17, 2014 in Jacksonville, Florida, United States
Available from: 2014-12-17 Created: 2014-12-17 Last updated: 2018-08-12Bibliographically approved
Jobe, W. (2014). No University Credit, No Problem?: Exploring Recognition of Non-Formal Learning. In: 2014 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference Proceedings, IEEE Computer Society, 2014, 2420-2426: . Paper presented at 2014 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE), Madrid, Spain, 22-25 October 2014 (pp. 2420-2426).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>No University Credit, No Problem?: Exploring Recognition of Non-Formal Learning
2014 (English)In: 2014 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference Proceedings, IEEE Computer Society, 2014, 2420-2426, 2014, p. 2420-2426Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) are disrupting traditional, higher education and redefining how learning takes place online. These open courses typically offer some form of recognition, such as a certificate of completion and/or digital badge, to recognize, validate, and in some cases even accredit learning. A general problem with MOOCs is the uncertainty regarding the use and goals of recognition, validation, and accreditation (RVA), and participants' acceptance and perception of such techniques. This research effort addresses this problem by exploring course partici-pants' attitudes and levels of acceptance of non-formal learning recognition compared to traditional university credit in both devel-oped and developing countries. The actual study uses both certifi-cates of completion and digital badges to recognize and validate learning in an introductory, university level course in web pro-gramming using HTML5/CSS. The course is available to anyone, but was specifically marketed to participants from Sweden and Kenya. Empirical data was gathered using interviews and online surveys in the course. The preliminary results are that participants from developing countries value digital recognition to a greater extent than their counterparts in Europe. However, both Swedes and Kenyans see open courses with digital recognition as a com-plement to traditional learning to individually construct an educa-tion.

Keywords
Non-formal learning, learning recognition, digital badges, MOOCs
National Category
Information Systems
Research subject
SOCIAL SCIENCE, Informatics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-7213 (URN)978-1-4799-3922-0 (ISBN)978-1-4799-3921-3 (ISBN)
Conference
2014 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE), Madrid, Spain, 22-25 October 2014
Available from: 2014-12-19 Created: 2014-12-19 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2378-5432

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