Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Bernhardsson, LennarthORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-9129-2923
Publications (10 of 21) Show all publications
Bernhardsson, L., Norström, L. & Andersson, M. (2019). Flipped And Open Seminars As A Method For Work Integrated Learning. In: L. Gómez Chova, A. López Martínez, I. Candel Torres (eds) (Ed.), INTED2019 Proceedings: . Paper presented at INTED2019, 13th annual International Technology, Education and Development Conference, Valencia, 11th, 12th and 13th of March, 2019. (pp. 4458-4466). Valencia: The International Academy of Technology, Education and Development
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Flipped And Open Seminars As A Method For Work Integrated Learning
2019 (English)In: INTED2019 Proceedings / [ed] L. Gómez Chova, A. López Martínez, I. Candel Torres (eds), Valencia: The International Academy of Technology, Education and Development, 2019, p. 4458-4466Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Since 2002 University West, Sweden has had a mission from the Swedish government to develop methods for work integrated learning (WIL). WIL is thus a “trademark” of the university and the university is continuously developing teaching models to enhance a synergy between theory and practice with the goal to improve education and students’ lifelong learning. A challenge in such work is a decreasing engagement among students to participate in seminars at campus, especially during periods of internship. In the study underlying this paper we therefore explore a new teaching and learning method that aims to stimulate students to come to campus and to discuss their experiences with peer students and teachers during their internship.The internship and the seminars are organized as a ‘WIL course’ in the fifth semester of the candidate program ‘Digital Media’. As part of the course the students spend four days a week in a workplace where they contribute substantially to the work at the workplace. One day a week they spend at campus to reflect, write and discuss topics related to the work and organization at the workplace e.g. organizational culture, how a work day is organized, how design work is organized, and how the workplace treats its customers. The students and teachers meet once every second week for a seminar where they discuss the above-mentioned themes. The reflections made at the seminars and the conversations are important for the learning goals at the course. However, the teachers experience a moderate interest from the students’ side to participate and the students tend to be ill prepared.To increase the value and learning for the students, a new approach for better structure and engagement has been introduced, where students in beforehand writtenly reflect on questions about their workplace in relation to the theme of the week. They write in open and shared documents so that all students before the seminare can take part of each others reflections and as such come to the seminar with a wider perspective on the particular theme. The seminar is then held at the campus where the themes are discussed and workplaces compared with help of a shared matrix where the students can place their workplace regarding level of structure, formality, creativity etc . As such the seminar has a ‘flipped’ character and the ICT tools for learning used are open and editable over time for all participants.The empirical material is based on 24 hours participant observations, 10 students’ written reflections and the course curricula. The findings show that the flipped and open approach to the seminars has made the students more engaged in reflections about their workplace, not only during the seminar at campus but also during their work at the workplace. The shared document stimulates reflections of differences between workplaces that has not been so clear before, and the matrix has helped the students to take the reflections to a higher level by reflecting over organizational culture and workplace conditions. By comparing each other’s experiences from a spectrum of different aspects/themes they get a more nuanced picture of the skills and competences needed in the workplace, and they get more strengthened in their professional role. The recurrent discussions over time during the course therefore contribute to make the students more experienced than they would had been by only having got the experience from their own workplace.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Valencia: The International Academy of Technology, Education and Development, 2019
Keywords
flipped seminar, open seminar, higher education, work integrated learning, shared experience, students.
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
Work Integrated Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-13769 (URN)978-84-09-08619-1 (ISBN)
Conference
INTED2019, 13th annual International Technology, Education and Development Conference, Valencia, 11th, 12th and 13th of March, 2019.
Available from: 2019-04-08 Created: 2019-04-08 Last updated: 2019-06-05Bibliographically approved
Pennbrant, S., Nunstedt, H. & Bernhardsson, L. (2019). Learning Through Reflection: The Portfolio Method As A Tool To Promote Work-Integrated Learning In Higher Education. In: L. Gómez Chova, A. López Martínez, I. Candel Torres (Ed.), INTED2019 Proceedings: . Paper presented at 13th International Technology, Education and Development Conference (pp. 729-739). Valencia: The International Academy of Technology, Education and Development
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Learning Through Reflection: The Portfolio Method As A Tool To Promote Work-Integrated Learning In Higher Education
2019 (English)In: INTED2019 Proceedings / [ed] L. Gómez Chova, A. López Martínez, I. Candel Torres, Valencia: The International Academy of Technology, Education and Development, 2019, p. 729-739Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Students need to develop meta-reflection to strengthen their learning process and to be able to manage the continuous changes encountered both higher education and in workplaces. Reflection is the most important for achieving progress within work integrated learning. For students to develop meta-reflection and achieve progression within work integrated learning, they need a systematic structure and conscious tools. The Portfolio method can be one of those tools.In this article we are going to discuss, from a theoretical standpoint, how teachers can develop a better structure for students so that they can strengthen their learning-process and progression of work integrated learning in higher education during internships which in turn promote lifelong learning. This progression of work integrated learning will be discussed in relation to the “WIL4U” model together with examples of reflection questions, learning outcomes, learning activities and examination forms. The “WIL4U” model was developed from the “AIL 4E (DUCATION)” model created by Bernhardsson, Gellerstedt and Svensson.The purpose of this conceptual discussion article is to highlight the portfolio method as a structure and tool for progress work integrated learning by reflection.With support of the portfolio method, the students can develop their ability to make well-balanced, and reflected choices in planning actions for work integrated learning. This requires well-developed self-regulation and the ability to meta-cognition and systematic meta-reflection to evaluate the effects of various actions. The portfolio method can also improve the reflection-process to develop the student's ability to emphasize strengths and increase the ability to achieve the learning outcomes in higher education.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Valencia: The International Academy of Technology, Education and Development, 2019
Keywords
lifelong learning, portfolio method, reflection, work integrated learning
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
Work Integrated Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-13770 (URN)10.21125/inted.2019.0257 (DOI)978-84-09-08619-1 (ISBN)
Conference
13th International Technology, Education and Development Conference
Available from: 2019-04-08 Created: 2019-04-08 Last updated: 2019-05-31Bibliographically approved
Gellerstedt, M., Gellerstedt, V., Bernhard, I., Bernhardsson, L., Lundh Snis, U. & Vallo Hult, H. (2019). Work-Integrated Learning: Impact of Individual and organizational Digitalization on Knowledge management and Expertise Sharing. In: L. Gómez Chova, A. López Martínez, I. Candel Torres (Ed.), INTED2019 Proceedings: . Paper presented at INTED2019, 13th annual International Technology, Education and Development Conference, Valencia, 11th, 12th and 13th of March, 2019. (pp. 3601-3609).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Work-Integrated Learning: Impact of Individual and organizational Digitalization on Knowledge management and Expertise Sharing
Show others...
2019 (English)In: INTED2019 Proceedings / [ed] L. Gómez Chova, A. López Martínez, I. Candel Torres, 2019, p. 3601-3609Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The primary aim with this study was to examine the impact of digitalization and the use of ICT for knowledge sharing in an organization. A secondary aim was to further develop knowledge management models to also include collaborative knowledge production and expertise sharing. Based on such a model, we developed a questionnaire answered by 265 respondents. We found that the relationship between using ICT for knowledge sharing was correlated to knowledge sharing also when adjusted for established factors like organisational climate and social norms. We conclude that digitalization, both individually and on an organisational level is an important asset for knowledge management, and that the use of ICT could support knowledge sharing beyond known and established important factors.

Keywords
Knowledge management, digitalization, work-integrated learning
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Research subject
Work Integrated Learning; SOCIAL SCIENCE, Informatics; SOCIAL SCIENCE, Informatics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-13816 (URN)978-84-09-08619-1 (ISBN)
Conference
INTED2019, 13th annual International Technology, Education and Development Conference, Valencia, 11th, 12th and 13th of March, 2019.
Available from: 2019-04-30 Created: 2019-04-30 Last updated: 2019-04-30Bibliographically approved
Haj-Bolouri, A., Purao, S., Rossi, M. & Bernhardsson, L. (2018). Action Design Research in Practice: Lessons and Concerns. In: Frank U.,Kautz K.,Bednar P.M. (Ed.), Proceedings ECIS 2018: . Paper presented at European Conference on Information Systems 2018, ECIS 2018, June 23rd – 28th 2018 / Portsmouth, UK. , Article ID 1755.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Action Design Research in Practice: Lessons and Concerns
2018 (English)In: Proceedings ECIS 2018 / [ed] Frank U.,Kautz K.,Bednar P.M., 2018, article id 1755Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This paper reports on the results of a study of how scholars engage with and use the action designresearch (ADR) method. Since its publication, ADR has been acknowledged as an importantvariant of DSR, and has been adopted by a number of researchers. It has been adopted as theprimary research method for doctoral dissertations as well as research projects in severaldisciplines. With the increasing use of ADR, the research community is also learning about how toapply ADR in different contexts. In this paper, we focus on how researchers are using the method.Drawing on primary data from researchers who have recently engaged in or finished an ADRproject, we identify several recurring themes: managing expectations with actual outcomes ofADR-projects, coordinating work across different ADR-stages, and balancing the focus on probleminstance versus class of problems. Our work contributes a greater understanding about how ADRprojects are carried out in practice, how researchers can avoid some of the common pitfalls, andhow the method can be applied more effectively.

Keywords
action design research, design science research, design knowledge
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Research subject
SOCIAL SCIENCE, Informatics; Work Integrated Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-13057 (URN)2-s2.0-85061316853 (Scopus ID)
Conference
European Conference on Information Systems 2018, ECIS 2018, June 23rd – 28th 2018 / Portsmouth, UK
Available from: 2018-10-26 Created: 2018-10-26 Last updated: 2019-02-27Bibliographically approved
Bernhardsson, L., Gellerstedt, M. & Svensson, L. (2018). An eye for an I: a framework with focus on the integration of work and learning in higher education. In: INTED 2018: Proceedings. Paper presented at INTED 2018, Valencia, 12th annual International Technology, Education and Development Conference Valencia, 5th, 6th and 7th of March, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An eye for an I: a framework with focus on the integration of work and learning in higher education
2018 (English)In: INTED 2018: Proceedings, 2018Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Higher education plays a new role in the society and the highly specialized labor market, and higher education institutes are expected to interact with and contribute to the surrounding society. University West in Sweden is since 2002 commissioned by the government to develop the pedagogical strategy called work-integrated learning (WIL) and WIL is the “trade mark” for the University. This means that pedagogical methods are based on WIL and that the faculty is working on further refinement and development in order to maximize the pedagogical gain offered by using the synergy between theory and practice.

Work-integrated-learning activities are often implemented in a course as methods aligned to the learning outcomes regarding knowledge in the specific subject. However, another perspective is that the capacity to reflect and understand the integration of theory and practice could actually be a learning outcome in itself. From this perspective, it is vital to theoretically frame and formulate stringent learnings outcomes. To have a clear framework for this is important for curriculum design, course delivery and assessment, as well.

In a self-evaluation conducted at the University, including focus groups with, both undergraduate and post graduate students, teachers, researchers and managers, a call for a framework has been expressed.

In this conceptual paper, we propose a framework to support, design, delivery and assessment of work-integrated-learning progression, i.e. understanding of the integration between theory and practice. This framework is inspired by theories regarding constructive alignment [3], the SOLO taxonomy, agentic learning, SAMR-model and the RAT-model. RAT means Replacement, Amplifying and Replacement [4] while SAMR is the acronym for Substitution, Augmentation, Modification and Redefinition [5]. Our WIL-4U has also been inspired by SOLO taxonomy [6]

In short, the framework for progression includes a progression from being descriptive regarding the observed practice, skills for comparing and evaluating practices, to be agentic in how theory and practice could be used in synergy for evolving, new theory and development of practice. Thereby, putting on eye on the “i” in WiL.

Ultimately such a framework could support the progression of “WiL-understanding” through an educational program, and that students after graduation have developed readiness for “life-long-learning” and could be agentic at workplaces in the sense that practice and theory are used in synergy.

Keywords
WIL, framework, integration, theory - practice
National Category
Learning
Research subject
Work Integrated Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-12218 (URN)978-84-697-9480-7 (ISBN)
Conference
INTED 2018, Valencia, 12th annual International Technology, Education and Development Conference Valencia, 5th, 6th and 7th of March, 2018
Available from: 2018-03-15 Created: 2018-03-15 Last updated: 2018-04-06Bibliographically approved
Bernhardsson, L. & Willermark, S. (2018). "Just in Time": Tidig feedback för ökat lärande. In: Kristina Johansson (Ed.), VILÄR Abstraktbok: . Paper presented at VILÄR, 6-7 december 2018, Mölndal, Sverige (pp. 7-7). Trollhättan: Högskolan Väst
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"Just in Time": Tidig feedback för ökat lärande
2018 (Swedish)In: VILÄR Abstraktbok / [ed] Kristina Johansson, Trollhättan: Högskolan Väst , 2018, p. 7-7Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Genomströmning är ett begrepp som ofta används för att mäta hur lönsam en kursär för lärosätet. Det ger ett ekonomiskt mått på en kurs. Det är också ett mått på kvaliteten i studenternas arbeten. Ju bättre kvalitet och måluppfyllelse en inlämningsuppgift har desto större sannolikhet för ett godkänt betyg. Samtidigt kan det också ge en indikation på huruvida innehållet är svårt att ta till sig eller om kursmål är svåra att uppnå. Kursen Integritet och demokrati i Digitala Media vid Mediaavdelningen, Högskolan väst, har under flera år kämpat med relativt lågt antal godkända examinationsuppgifter vid första examinationstillfälle. Problemet diskuterades i lärarlaget och för att åtgärda problemet bestämde lärarna sig för att lämna feedback till studenterna i ett tidigare skede av kursen, med ett tydlig fokus på vad som behövde förbättras för att bli godkänd. Åtgärden resulterade i en ökad genomströmning och i denna text diskuteras vikten av att ge feedback i tid. Metoden för iterativ feedback ser vi också kan användas vid utbildningstillfällen där arbetsintegrerat lärande är ett kursmål.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Trollhättan: Högskolan Väst, 2018
Keywords
Feedback, Formativ bedömning, Högre utbildning
National Category
Learning
Research subject
Work Integrated Learning; SOCIAL SCIENCE, Pedagogics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-13444 (URN)978-91-87531-46-0 (ISBN)978-91-87531-47-7 (ISBN)
Conference
VILÄR, 6-7 december 2018, Mölndal, Sverige
Available from: 2019-01-22 Created: 2019-01-22 Last updated: 2019-01-23Bibliographically approved
Bernhardsson, P. & Bernhardsson, L. (2018). Personal Learning Environment For Learning After University. In: INTED 2018: Proceedings. Paper presented at INTED 2018, 12th annual International Technology, Education and Development Conference, Valencia, 5th, 6th and 7th of March, 2018..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Personal Learning Environment For Learning After University
2018 (English)In: INTED 2018: Proceedings, 2018Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

It is becoming increasingly common for universities and schools to use some form of digital system between teachers and students. They usually use a Learning Management System (LMS). Watson [1] discusses the concept and systems used today and believes that the intentions with LMS are good but they lack valuable functions. They have most often been used to distribute instructions to students. It is a unified information that applies to all participants and is not in any way individualized or gives the individual student the unique support that may be needed for a good learning environment.

Learning in the digital era requires new skills focusing on different digital artefacts [2]. Learning is also a lifelong process that not only happens in an institutional context. Learning takes place in both formal and informal contexts. Learning and work-related activities are connected today, and education needs to be shaped to support a continued process even after completion of formal learning [3].

Instead of standardized one-way solutions for transferring instructions, in which is the way many LMS are used, students should during their time at the college learn tools that support learning and communication with others. By using the tools used in working life during the study time, the boundary is blurred between the school's LMS and tools commonly used in working life. [3]. Many LMS used in higher education is not used in business and the skills gained by students through LMS cannot easily be transformed into knowledge of the tools that companies use. By introducing tools that are widely used in business, students can create their own set of tools for communication, project management and information retrieval. The tools can then contribute to encouraging their own critical search of information based on which they can shape their unique knowledge and to act as an "agentic learner" [4]. The use of an LMS that students cannot use after completing studies does not give the same opportunities for continued learning as a set of ‘open tools’. They need to create a Personal Learning Environment (PLE) so that they can then continue to use same tools after completed studies. [5]

Richards et al [6] describes a driven student as an "agentic learner". A self-employed individual with both pleasure and ability to learn as such can determine what needs to be learned from knowledge goals in a syllabus related to the individual's existing knowledge. In order to become such a driven student, a larger "toolbox" for learning is needed than a standardized LMS solution often offers.

It is not new tools within LMS, adjustments and minor changes, which are needed. It is a whole new perspective where the focus is shifted from LMS to PLE. It is difficult to create understanding among students how tools locked in an LMS provide knowledge for an upcoming work life. A whole new set of tools is needed or what is described as a system change by Reigeluth [7]. A whole new perspective on what tools that support lifelong learning and not only university studies. Since the LMS is connected to the university the LMS is closed for external access and the student cannot access it after they leave the University.

In this paper we discuss, based on a theoretical perspective, whether open cloud-based tools can form the student's PLE to replace the university's LMS.

Keywords
PLE, LMS, Open Learning Resources
National Category
Learning
Research subject
SOCIAL SCIENCE, Educational science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-12221 (URN)978-84-697-9480-7 (ISBN)
Conference
INTED 2018, 12th annual International Technology, Education and Development Conference, Valencia, 5th, 6th and 7th of March, 2018.
Available from: 2018-03-15 Created: 2018-03-15 Last updated: 2018-04-06Bibliographically approved
Haj-Bolouri, A., Purao, S., Rossi, M. & Bernhardsson, L. (2017). Action Design Research as a Method-in-Use: Problems and Opportunities. In: Maedche, Alexander [Hrsg.]; Brocke, Jan vom [Hrsg.]; Hevner, Alan [Hrsg.] (Ed.), Designing the Digital Transformation: DESRIST 2017 Research in Progress Proceedings. Paper presented at The 12th International Conference in Design Science Research in Information Technology and Systems. Karlsruhe, Germany. 30 MAY - 1 JUNE, 2017 (pp. 110-118). Karlsruhe: KIT Publishers
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Action Design Research as a Method-in-Use: Problems and Opportunities
2017 (English)In: Designing the Digital Transformation: DESRIST 2017 Research in Progress Proceedings / [ed] Maedche, Alexander [Hrsg.]; Brocke, Jan vom [Hrsg.]; Hevner, Alan [Hrsg.], Karlsruhe: KIT Publishers, 2017, p. 110-118Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper reports on the results of a study to investigate how scholars engage with and use the action design research (ADR) approach. ADR has been acknowledged as an important variant of the Design Science Research approach, and has been adopted by a number of scholars, as the methodological basis for doctoral dissertations as well as multidisciplinary research projects. With thisuse, the research community is learning about how to apply ADR's central tenets in different contexts. In this paper, we draw on primary data from researchers who have recently engaged in or finished an ADR project to identify recurring problems and opportunities related to working in different ADR stages, balancing demands from practice and research, and addressing problem instance vs. class of problems. Our work contributes a greater understanding of how ADR projects are carried out in practice, how researchers use ADR, and pointers to possibilities for extending ADR.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Karlsruhe: KIT Publishers, 2017
Series
KIT Scientific Working Papers, ISSN 2194-1629 ; 64
Keywords
Action design research, Use, Design science research and practice
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Research subject
Work Integrated Learning; SOCIAL SCIENCE, Informatics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-11007 (URN)10.5445/IR/1000069452 (DOI)
Conference
The 12th International Conference in Design Science Research in Information Technology and Systems. Karlsruhe, Germany. 30 MAY - 1 JUNE, 2017
Available from: 2017-06-14 Created: 2017-06-14 Last updated: 2018-01-08Bibliographically approved
Bernhardsson, L., Vallo Hult, H. & Gellerstedt, M. (2017). Combining pedagogical strategies and ICT support for fostering the digitalized agentic learner. In: INTED2017 Proceedings: . Paper presented at 11th International Technology, Education and Development Conference, 6-8 March, 2017, Valencia, Spain (pp. 1433-1441).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Combining pedagogical strategies and ICT support for fostering the digitalized agentic learner
2017 (English)In: INTED2017 Proceedings, 2017, p. 1433-1441Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Higher education is facing exceptional challenges due to an increased complexity on the labour market. The work life of today is highly specialized and demands continuous education, i.e. lifelong learning. Higher education must focus on developing competencies for work life, beyond traditional theoretical knowledge [1]. To cater for these demands, higher education must adopt more application-oriented and trans-disciplinary research [2]. Moreover, colleges and universities could more systematically take responsibility for career development and adjust curricula for both traditional and non-traditional students [3]. A crucial question to address is how higher education could foster a student to become a “lifelong learner”? From a pedagogical perspective, it is of course vital to teach a student how to learn [4], aiming at achieving the skill to become a self-directed learner. Interestingly, it is argued that the qualities for being a proactive and agentic learner in higher education are the very same abilities required for effective professional practice [5]. We need to use educational strategies, e.g. work-integrated learning (WiL), as a part of the preparation of becoming an agentic learner, that permit them to successfully negotiate, engage and learn from what they are afforded, for both personal and professional outcomes [6]. Furthermore, we need to adopt important key factors that support fostering agentic learners [7]. 

In parallel to pedagogical strategies and key factors, Information and Communication Technology (ICT) could play an important role for continuous learning [8-10]. Research shows that over the recent years, social media has been pointed out as a tool, not only for external communication, but also for informal learning within organizations [11-14]. 

In this paper we wish to suggest a combination where important pedagogical strategies are combined with ICT-support. Moreover, we wish to suggest a strategy for how this combination could be practiced in higher education, making the transfer to work life smoother. 

We acknowledge that students of today most often have good knowledge of the use of various digital tools such as Facebook, Youtube etc. This is however often constrained to the use of various platforms and tools for entertainment and social contacts. How these tools can be used for learning portfolios, both during their studies and for lifelong learning, is less known and used. We suggest that students during their education choose digital tools based on individual preferences and build a personal learning environment (PLE) [15]. The PLE should include “open tools”, such tools are available outside closed systems within organizations, in order to be useful also after graduation. The student has the possible to develop and re-use knowledge of tools and platforms to work in the new context, working life. However, the use of a PLE will not in itself do the trick. 

Portfolio is one of many tools to assess learning. When the digital development progressed and applications on the Internet has expanded, the portfolio characteristics can be changed to the e-portfolio [16]. We advocate that both teachers and student need support for developing pedagogical strategies that optimize the use of ICT and aims at fostering agentic learners. We suggest that an e-portfolio may constitute such a joint support. 

In this paper we will show that an e-portfolio and PLE can support important factors for fostering agentic learners who in an efficient way take advantage of modern ICT. In sum, we suggest an approach for fostering “digitalized agentic learners”. 

Keywords
e-portfolio, work integrated learning, agentic learner
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
Work Integrated Learning; SOCIAL SCIENCE, Pedagogics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-10918 (URN)10.21125/inted.2017.0475 (DOI)978-84-617-8491-2 (ISBN)
Conference
11th International Technology, Education and Development Conference, 6-8 March, 2017, Valencia, Spain
Available from: 2017-04-26 Created: 2017-04-26 Last updated: 2017-04-26Bibliographically approved
Bernhardsson, L., Gellerstedt, M. & Winman, T. (2017). Work-integrated-learning: So what?: A framework for describing the level of integration between work and learning. In: ICERI2017 Proceedings: . Paper presented at 10th annual International Conference of Education, Research and Innovation, IICERI 2017, Sevilla, Spain. 16-18 November, 2017. (pp. 443-451).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Work-integrated-learning: So what?: A framework for describing the level of integration between work and learning
2017 (English)In: ICERI2017 Proceedings, 2017, p. 443-451Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The knowledge society of today is characterized by a continuously ongoing technological development and digitalization that steadily calls for new competencies and transforms existing professions. For being able to provide up-to-date competence in a fast-changing labor market there is, perhaps more than ever, a need for extensive cooperation between Universities and surrounding society. A number of different models supporting the civic university has been established, e.g. “entrepreneurial university”, the triple-helix model and the increasingly popular adoption of “work-integrated learning” (WIL). 

Work-integrated learning offer students authentic learning experiences and create synergy between theory and practice, e.g. by cooperative educational programs, internship, sandwich programs and case based teaching. Beyond the pedagogical benefits with experiential learning, WIL also supports the transfer between higher education and work, i.e. increases readiness, employability and also encourage a more agentic engagement. Furthermore, research results show that WIL-students have career benefits regarding salary in early career and job advancement. Even though, WIL and similar strategies for combining theory and practice seems to have promising pedagogical and career advantages, the theoretical underpinning is still underdeveloped. For instance, the methodology for how learning is promoted and which role external partners could play is vague. 

At University West with more than 25 years’ experience of WIL a holistic approach to WIL have been adopted and WIL permeates all the Universities activities: education, research and extensive collaboration with the surrounding society. Over the years our efforts have been formalized and a taxonomy for will-activities have been developed. In sum, we know that WIL have promising potential, and we know what to do. But, in a recently performed study at this University, based on focus groups interviews and consolidation of our experiences we identified that even if the question “what?” is responded to, there is an important sub-question to be addressed, namely: “so what?”. When adopting different WIL activities, both small and large scale activities, e.g. a guest lecture or an internship, it is reasonable to reflect on whether these activities are used in an optimal way? What kind of impact does the WIL-activity imply? What could be achieved by successful integration between theory and practice? Could it be visualized?

Inspired by models used for integrating technique in education (RAT, SAMR and TPCK-models), we have developed a framework for the progression of work-integrated learning in education. The framework is in a sense a model for “Wil-value”. This framework could be used on different levels and in different context: in a single course, educational program, in research projects, cooperation with surrounding society, mentorship and on partner workplaces.

Keywords
WIL, work-integrated learning, digitalization, framework
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Work Integrated Learning; SOCIAL SCIENCE, Informatics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-11893 (URN)10.21125/iceri.2017.0165 (DOI)978-84-697-6957-7 (ISBN)
Conference
10th annual International Conference of Education, Research and Innovation, IICERI 2017, Sevilla, Spain. 16-18 November, 2017.
Available from: 2017-12-06 Created: 2017-12-06 Last updated: 2018-01-04Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-9129-2923

Search in DiVA

Show all publications