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Publications (10 of 31) Show all publications
Arakelian, E., Rudolfsson, G., Rask-Andersen, A., Runeson-Broberg, R. & Wålinder, R. (2019). I Stay: Swedish Specialist Nurses in the Perioperative Context and Their Reasons to Stay at Their Workplace. Journal of Perianesthesia Nursing, 34(3), 633-644
Open this publication in new window or tab >>I Stay: Swedish Specialist Nurses in the Perioperative Context and Their Reasons to Stay at Their Workplace
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Perianesthesia Nursing, ISSN 1089-9472, E-ISSN 1532-8473, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 633-644Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose To investigate why nurse anesthetists and operating room nurses choose to stay in the same workplace.

Design Qualitative design.

Methods Individual interviews were conducted with 15 nurse specialists from four hospitals in Sweden. Two men and 13 women aged between 43 and 63 participated. Data were analyzed with systematic text condensation according to Malterud.

Findings Three themes were identified. (1) Organizational stability contributed to low staff turnover, with good spirits between colleagues, representing everyone’s equal value and resulting in a feeling of homelikeness. (2) Sustained development in one’s own profession. (3) A humane head nurse who was at hand, who was a facilitator, who knew staff members, and eliminated obstacles for them.

Conclusions In a nonhierarchical and stable organization with a head nurse with caritative leadership skills, a welcoming working environment with opportunities for professional development is created. Thus, nurse specialists choose to stay, contributing to organizational development.

Keywords
qualitative, homelikeness, job satisfaction, stay at work, thematic analysis, work stability
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-13148 (URN)10.1016/j.jopan.2018.06.095 (DOI)000469462400022 ()
Available from: 2018-12-19 Created: 2018-12-19 Last updated: 2019-06-20Bibliographically approved
Rudolfsson, G. & Karlsson, V. (2019). Interacting with parents in Sweden who hesitate or refrain from vaccinating their child. Journal of Child Health Care, Article ID 1367493519867170.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interacting with parents in Sweden who hesitate or refrain from vaccinating their child
2019 (English)In: Journal of Child Health Care, ISSN 1367-4935, E-ISSN 1741-2889, article id 1367493519867170Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this study was to explore nurses' experiences of encountering parents who are hesitant about or refrain from vaccinating their child. A qualitative approach was chosen and data collected through individual, semi-structured interviews with 12 nurses. The text was analyzed using thematic analysis. Three themes emerged from the interviews: giving room and time for acknowledging parents' insecurity concerning vaccination, striving to approach the parents' position with tact, and a struggle between feelings of failure and respect for the parents' view. The findings indicate that it was crucial to give time, be tactful when meeting parents, as well as to appear credible and up-to-date. The nurses wanted to be open and respect the parents' views on vaccination but found it difficult and frustrating to be unable to reach out with their message because their quest was to protect the child.

Keywords
Child health nurse, hesitation, parents, thematic analysis, vaccination
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-14350 (URN)10.1177/1367493519867170 (DOI)000479355000001 ()31359790 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85070372013 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-10-02 Created: 2019-10-02 Last updated: 2019-10-31Bibliographically approved
Flensner, G. & Rudolfsson, G. (2018). A pathway towards reconciliation and wellbeing: A spouse's experiences of living with a partner diagnosed with early-onset dementia. Nordisk sygeplejeforskning, 8(02), 136-149
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A pathway towards reconciliation and wellbeing: A spouse's experiences of living with a partner diagnosed with early-onset dementia
2018 (English)In: Nordisk sygeplejeforskning, ISSN 1892-2678, E-ISSN 1892-2686, Vol. 8, no 02, p. 136-149Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

When someone falls ill with dementia it affects the whole family. Therefore, the aim of thisqualitative single case study was to increase understanding of one female spouse´s experiencesof living with a husband/partner diagnosed with early-onset dementia before the ageof 40 years. Two open-ended interviews with the female spouse were performed sixmonths apart and analysed for narrative structure and themes. The single case is describedin the form of a story and organised along a time line comprising four phases; «Somethingis wrong», «Becoming aware of what is wrong», «Life is restricted» and «Towards reconciliation».Healthcare professionals should meet spouses with respect, listen to them and providepractical support, thus giving them the opportunity to rest, obtain respite and time ontheir own to enable reconciliation and wellbeing.

Keywords
Caregiver, frontotemporal dementia, health, spouse, struggle, suffering, time
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-12700 (URN)10.18261/issn.1892-2686-2018-02-05 (DOI)000434374000005 ()
Available from: 2018-07-05 Created: 2018-07-05 Last updated: 2019-02-05Bibliographically approved
Lögde, A., Rudolfsson, G., Broberg, R. R., Rask-Andersen, A., Wålinder, R. & Arakelian, E. (2018). I am quitting my job: Specialist nurses in perioperative context and their experiences of the process and reasons to quit their job. International Journal for Quality in Health Care, 30(4), 313-320
Open this publication in new window or tab >>I am quitting my job: Specialist nurses in perioperative context and their experiences of the process and reasons to quit their job
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2018 (English)In: International Journal for Quality in Health Care, ISSN 1353-4505, E-ISSN 1464-3677, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 313-320Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The lack of specialist nurses in operating theatres is a serious problem. The aim of this study was to describe reasons why specialist nurses in perioperative care chose to leave their workplaces and to describe the process from the thought to the decision. Twenty specialist nurses (i.e. anaesthesia, NA, and operating room nurses) from seven university- and county hospitals in Sweden participated in qualitative individual in-depth interviews. Data were analysed by systematic text condensation. We identified four themes of reasons why specialist nurses quitted their jobs: the head nurses' betrayal and dismissive attitude, and not feeling needed; inhumane working conditions leading to the negative health effects; not being free to decide about one's life and family life being more important than work; and, colleagues' diminishing behaviour. Leaving one's job was described as a process and specialist nurses had thought about it for some time. Two main reasons were described; the head nurse manager's dismissive attitude and treatment of their employees and colleagues' mistreatment and colleagues' diminishing behaviour. Increasing knowledge on the role of the head nurse managers in specialist nurses' decision making for leaving their workplace, and creating a friendly, non-violent workplace, may give the opportunity for them to take action before it is too late.

Keywords
quitting job, specialist nurse, qualitative, interviews, nurses operating room workplace feelings
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-12205 (URN)10.1093/intqhc/mzy023 (DOI)000432295500012 ()29518200 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85052153099 (Scopus ID)
Note

Published: 06 March 2018

Available from: 2018-04-09 Created: 2018-04-09 Last updated: 2019-01-23Bibliographically approved
Solbakken, R., Bergdahl, E., Rudolfsson, G. & Bondas, T. (2018). International Nursing: Caring in Nursing Leadership : A Meta-ethnography From the Nurse Leader's Perspective.. Nursing Administration Quarterly, 42(4), E1-E19
Open this publication in new window or tab >>International Nursing: Caring in Nursing Leadership : A Meta-ethnography From the Nurse Leader's Perspective.
2018 (English)In: Nursing Administration Quarterly, ISSN 0363-9568, E-ISSN 1550-5103, Vol. 42, no 4, p. E1-E19Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To explore and derive new conceptual understanding of nurse leaders' experiences and perceptions of caring in nursing.

RESEARCH QUESTION: What is caring in nursing leadership from the nurse leaders' perspectives? There is a paucity of theoretical studies of caring in nursing leadership. Noblit and Hares interpretative meta-ethnography was chosen because of its interpretative potential for theory development. Caring in nursing leadership is a conscious movement between different "rooms" in the leader's "house" of leadership. This emerged as the metaphor that illustrates the core of caring in nursing leadership, presented in a tentative model. There are 5 relation-based rooms: The "patient room," where nurse leaders try to avoid patient suffering through their clinical presence; the "staff room," where nurse leaders trust and respect each other and facilitate dialogue; the "superior's room," where nurse leaders confirm peer relationships; the "secret room," where the leaders' strength to hang on and persist is nurtured; and the "organizational room," where limited resources are continuously being balanced. Caring in nursing leadership means nurturing and growing relationships to safeguard the best nursing care. This presupposes that leaders possess a consciousness of the different "rooms." If rooms are not given equal attention, movement stops, symbolizing that caring in leadership stops as well. One room cannot be given so much attention that others are neglected. Leaders need solid competence in nursing leadership to balance multiple demands in organizations; otherwise, their perceptiveness and the priority of "ministering to the patients" can be blurred.

National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-12902 (URN)10.1097/NAQ.0000000000000314 (DOI)30180085 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85054896684 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-09-13 Created: 2018-09-13 Last updated: 2018-10-29Bibliographically approved
Rejnö, Å., Nordin, P., Forsgren, S., Sundell, Y. & Rudolfsson, G. (2017). Nursing students’ attendance at learning activities in relation to attainment and passing courses: a prospective quantitative study. Nurse Education Today, 50(March), 36-41
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nursing students’ attendance at learning activities in relation to attainment and passing courses: a prospective quantitative study
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2017 (English)In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 50, no March, p. 36-41Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Students' motivation and ways of engaging in their schoolwork are important for their performance, including passing exams. Attendance at learning activities has also been argued to be of major importance, although no causal relationship with passing exams has been established in nursing education.

Objectives

The aim of this study was to describe the impact of attendance at nonmandatory learning activities on attainment, in terms of passing or failing of exams, in nursing education courses including both mandatory and non-mandatory activities.

Design

A prospective quantitative design.

Setting

The nursing education programme at a Swedish university.

Participants

Nursing students (n = 361) from two courses and four classes within the nursing programme.

Methods

Attendance was registered at every non-mandatory teaching activity by asking the students to note their attendance on a list. Data such as sex, age, and whether the students had passed the exam were also collected for each course and each semester separately.

Results

Increased participation was associated with an increasing proportion of students passing the exam. The chance of passing the exam increased by 13% for every additional learning occasion attended. Logistic regression showed an OR of 5.4 for an attendance of 100%.

Conclusions

An increase in attendance gave a higher proportion of exam passes. Encouraging students to attend non-mandatory learning activities could be of value, and potentially contribute to an increased graduation rate for nursing students.

Keywords
Attendance; Attainment; Examination pass; Nurse education; Prospective study
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-10419 (URN)10.1016/j.nedt.2016.11.025 (DOI)000393017300007 ()28012360 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85006790591 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-12-28 Created: 2016-12-28 Last updated: 2017-12-18Bibliographically approved
Nunstedt, H., Rudolfsson, G., Alsén, P. & Pennbrant, S. (2017). Patients' Variations of Reflection About and Understanding of Long-term Illness: Impact of Illness Perception on Trust in Oneself or Others. Open Nursing Journal, 11, 43-53
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patients' Variations of Reflection About and Understanding of Long-term Illness: Impact of Illness Perception on Trust in Oneself or Others
2017 (English)In: Open Nursing Journal, ISSN 1874-4346, E-ISSN 1874-4346, Vol. 11, p. 43-53Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Patients' understanding of their illness is of great importance for recovery. Lacking understanding of the illness is linked with the patients' level of reflection about and interest in understanding their illness. Objective: To describe patients’ variations of reflection about and understanding of their illness and how this understanding affects their trust in themselves or others. Method: The study is based on the “Illness perception” model. Latent content analysis was used for the data analysis. Individual, semi-structured, open-ended and face-to-face interviews were conducted with patients (n=11) suffering from a long-term illness diagnosed at least six months prior to the interview. Data collection took place in the three primary healthcare centres treating the participants. Results: The results show variations in the degree of reflection about illness. Patients search for deeper understanding of the illness for causal explanations, compare different perspectives for preventing complication of their illness, trust healthcare providers, and develop own strategies to manage life. Conclusion: Whereas some patients search for deeper understanding of their illness, other patients are less reflective and feel they can manage the illness without further understanding. Patients' understanding of their illness is related to their degree of trust in themselves or others. Patients whose illness poses an existential threat are more likely to reflect more about their illness and what treatment methods are available.

Keywords
Illness perception, Knowledge, Learning, Primary healthcare, Reflection, Understanding
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-10930 (URN)10.2174/1874434601711010043 (DOI)28567169 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85020387239 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Ja
Available from: 2017-05-09 Created: 2017-05-09 Last updated: 2019-05-21Bibliographically approved
Nunstedt, H., Rudolfsson, G., Alsén, P. & Pennbrant, S. (2017). Strategies for healthcare professionals to facilitate patient illness understanding.. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 26(23-24), 4696-4706
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Strategies for healthcare professionals to facilitate patient illness understanding.
2017 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 26, no 23-24, p. 4696-4706Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To describe how healthcare professionals facilitate patient illness understanding.

BACKGROUND: Healthcare professionals and patients differ in their illness understanding. If the information provided by healthcare professionals is not adapted to the patient's daily life it may be unusable for the patient. Previous research has found that healthcare professionals should individualise the information to enable the patient to apply the knowledge to the personal situation and to develop illness understanding. However, little is known of how healthcare professionals can facilitate patient illness understanding.

METHOD: A qualitative descriptive study based on individual, semi-structured, open-ended and face-to-face interviews was conducted with healthcare professionals (n=11) concerning how they facilitate patients illness understanding. Three health centres were involved during the period of March to November 2014. The interviews were analysed with qualitative content analysis.

RESULTS: The result identified a continuous and collaborative process with three strategies used by healthcare professionals to facilitate the patient's illness understanding: 1) assess the patient's illness understanding, 2) interact with the patient to develop illness understanding, and 3) support the patient's personal development for illness understanding. The steps in the process depend on each other.

CONCLUSIONS: The results of our analysis indicate that healthcare professionals can use the continuous and collaborative process to enhance the patient's self-care ability and turn his or her knowledge into action for improving illness understanding.

RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The three continuous and collaborative process strategies involving pedagogical approaches can create conditions for healthcare professionals to obtain a holistic view of the patient's life and to be a key resource for person-centred care. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Keywords
Facilitate, healthcare professionals, illness understanding, individual care plan, patient, pedagogical approach, person-centred care, strategies
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-10900 (URN)10.1111/jocn.13820 (DOI)000416319600082 ()28334458 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85021211796 (Scopus ID)
Note

Online 23 March 2017

Available from: 2017-04-26 Created: 2017-04-26 Last updated: 2019-02-05Bibliographically approved
Arakelian, E., Swenne, C. L., Lindberg, S., Rudolfsson, G. & von Vogelsang, A.-C. (2017). The meaning of person-centred care in the perioperative nursing context from the patient's perspective: an integrative review. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 26(17-18), 2527-2544
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The meaning of person-centred care in the perioperative nursing context from the patient's perspective: an integrative review
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 26, no 17-18, p. 2527-2544Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To determine the meaning of person-centred care from the patient's perspective and in the context of perioperative nursing. BACKGROUND: Person-centred care (PCC) is used but not defined in the perioperative context. The concept indicates an interest in the patient's own experience of health, illness, needs and preferences. As with many terms that are frequently used, there is a tendency for person-centred care to mean different things to different people in different contexts. METHODS: A two-part search strategy was employed; firstly, a computerized database search of PubMed and CINAHL, using Medical Subject Headings and free terms to search articles dating from 2004 to 2014, and secondly, a hand-search of those articles' reference lists was performed. Twenty-three articles were selected and an integrative review was conducted. RESULTS: Four themes were discovered: 'Being recognized as a unique entity and being allowed to be the person you are', 'Being considered important by having one's personal wishes taken into account', 'The presence of a perioperative nurse is calming; prevents feelings of loneliness and promotes wellbeing, which may speed up recovery', and 'Being close to and being touched by the perioperative nurse during surgery'. CONCLUSIONS: PCC means respecting the patient as a unique individual, considering the patient's particularities and wishes, and involving the patient in their own care. PCC also implies having access to one's own nurse who is present both physically and emotionally through the entire perioperative process and who guides the patient and follows up postoperatively, guaranteeing that the patient is not alone. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: By having a common understanding of the concept of PCC, the nurse anaesthetists' and theatre nurses' caring actions or concerns will be directed towards the patient', resulting in personalization of care rather than simply defining the concept. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Keywords
Integrative review, nursing, patient perspective, perioperative, person-centred care
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-10325 (URN)10.1111/jocn.13639 (DOI)000408919200003 ()27862496 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85013466015 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-12-16 Created: 2016-12-16 Last updated: 2017-10-10Bibliographically approved
Andersson, K., Shadloo, M. & Rudolfsson, G. (2016). Growing as a Human Being€”: Obese Adolescents' Experiences of the Changing Body. Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families, 31(1), e53-e62
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Growing as a Human Being€”: Obese Adolescents' Experiences of the Changing Body
2016 (English)In: Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families, ISSN 0882-5963, E-ISSN 1532-8449, Vol. 31, no 1, p. e53-e62Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of the presented study was to describe how obese adolescents experience themselves and their bodies and how their views changed as a result of participation in a weight loss program. A total of five adolescents were interviewed in this qualitative study. Data were analyzed by means of content analysis. One main theme emerged, “Growing as a human being”, which comprised four themes based on 13 sub-themes. Being part of a weight loss program was a time of transition that led not only to weight reduction but also to a higher level of well-being and a feeling of dignity.

Keywords
Adolescents, Being ashamed, Being valued, Body, Content analysis, Sharing responsibility, Transition
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-8042 (URN)10.1016/j.pedn.2015.07.007 (DOI)000368560700006 ()26320883 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84958938462 (Scopus ID)
Note

SI: Achievements, Challenges, and Implications for Pediatric Nursing in the Post-Genomic Era

Available online 25 August 2015

Funders: Council for Research and Development; Södra Älvsborgs sjukhus.

Available from: 2015-09-01 Created: 2015-09-01 Last updated: 2019-02-07Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3593-4511

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