Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Publications (10 of 29) Show all publications
Flensner, G., Landtblom, A.-M., Söderhamn, O. & Ek, A.-C. (2013). Work capacity and health-related quality of life among individuals with multiple sclerosis reduced by fatigue: a cross-sectional study. BMC Public Health, 13(224), 1-10
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Work capacity and health-related quality of life among individuals with multiple sclerosis reduced by fatigue: a cross-sectional study
2013 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 13, no 224, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Among individuals diagnosed with the chronic neurologic disease, multiple sclerosis (MS), a majority suffers from fatigue, which strongly influences their every-day-life. The aim of this study was to investigate work capacity and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in a group of MS patients and also to investigate if work capacity and HRQoL could be predicted by background factors, fatigue, heat sensitivity, cognitive dysfunction, emotional distress or degree of disability. Methods: A descriptive, cross-sectional, designed survey was undertaken A questionnaire was sent to 323 individuals diagnosed with MS, aged between 20 and 65 years, with physical disability on the expanded disability status score (EDSS) in the interval 0 ≥ EDSS ≤ 6.5, living in Östergötland county in eastern Sweden. Questions on background factors, occupation and work, together with the health-related quality of life short form instrument (SF-36), the fatigue severity scale (FSS), the perceived deficit questionnaire (PDQ) and the hospital anxiety depression scale (HAD) were posed. Associations between variables were analyzed using Pearson’s and Spearman’s correlations. Differences between groups were tested using the Chi-square test, the Mann Whitney U-test, and the Student’s t-test. Predictive factors were analyzed using multiple linear and multiple logistic regression analysis. Results: Of those who completed the questionnaire (n = 257, 79.6%), 59.8% were working. Work capacity was found significantly more among men (p < 0.005), those with a higher level of education (p < 0.001), those reporting less fatigue (p < 0.001), and those having no heat sensitivity (p = 0.004). For work capacity, significant predictors were low physical disability (EDSS), low fatigue, higher level of education, male sex and lower age. Those with work capacity showed significantly higher HRQoL than those who had no work capacity (p < 0.001). Levels of fatigue, cognition and emotional distress were found to be major contributing factors for HRQoL. Conclusions: Work capacity and HRQoL among individuals diagnosed with MS are highly influenced by fatigue which can be considered as a key symptom. Work capacity was influenced by heat-sensitivity, cognitive difficulties and emotional distress and significant predictive factors besides fatigue, were physical disability (EDSS), age, sex, and level of education. Remaining at work also gives a better HRQoL.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: BioMed Central, 2013
Keywords
cognition, education, emotional distress, heat sensitivity, regression analysis
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science; NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Public health science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-5210 (URN)10.1186/1471-2458-13-224 (DOI)000317116400001 ()2-s2.0-84874940265 (Scopus ID)
Projects
MS-projekt
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2013-03-25 Created: 2013-03-25 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Athlin, E., Larsson, M. & Söderhamn, O. (2012). A model for a national clinical final examination in the Swedish bachelor programme in nursing. Journal of Nursing Management, 20(1), 90-101
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A model for a national clinical final examination in the Swedish bachelor programme in nursing
2012 (English)In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 90-101Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim To describe the development and evaluation of a model for a national clinical final examination in the bachelor nursing education.

Background After the transfer of nursing education to the academy, concerns have been raised among nurses, nurse leaders, lecturers and researchers about the nursing students clinical competence at the entrance to professional life.

Methods During 2003 to 2005, a collaborative project was carried out between four universities and adjunctive health-care areas supplying clinical placements in Sweden. A two-part examination was agreed upon comprising a written theoretical test and a bedside test. An assessment tool for the bedside test was created. Nursing students, nurses and clinical lecturers participated voluntarily in the evaluation.

Results The model was highly appreciated, and its relevance, usability, and validity were considered quite good for the assessment of nursing students clinical competence at the final stage of their education. Several deficiencies were revealed, which led to further development of the model.

Conclusions and implications for nursing management The development and first evaluation of the model proved encouraging for further use, but it needs further evaluation. Involvement of nursing managers is necessary in order to satisfy new demands on competence and staffing of clinical nurses.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2012
Keywords
collaboration, competence assessment, nursing education, tool development
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-4135 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2834.2011.01278.x (DOI)000298918600012 ()2-s2.0-84855525402 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Klinisk slutexamination
Available from: 2012-02-09 Created: 2012-02-09 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Fex, A., Flensner, G., Ek, A.-C. & Söderhamn, O. (2012). Self-care agency and perceived health among people using advanced medical technology at home. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 68(4), 806-815
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-care agency and perceived health among people using advanced medical technology at home
2012 (English)In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 68, no 4, p. 806-815Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim.

This article reports a study of self-care agency and perceived health in a group

of people using advanced medical technology at home.

 

Background.

An increasing number of people are using medical technology for selfcare.

Few studies describe daily life in this context at an overriding level, irrespective

of the specific sort of technology. A connection between self-care, perceived health

and sense of coherence has previously been implied.

 

Methods.

A descriptive, comparative, cross-sectional quantitative design was used.

Data were collected from a questionnaire during the winter of 2009/2010. The

questionnaire addressed perceived health and daily life with medical technology.

Swedish versions of the Appraisal of Self-care Agency scale and the 13-item version

of Antonovsky’s sense of coherence scale were included.

 

Results.

The questionnaire was answered by 180 adults performing self-care at

home involving long-term oxygen, a ventilator, or peritoneal- or haemo-dialysis.

Health-related and technology-related variables in daily life were mostly highly

satisfactory. Perceived health was rated significantly lower among participants using

long-term oxygen. Sufficient sense of coherence, knowledge of how to use technology,

close contact with others and not feeling helpless contributed positively to

self-care agency. Positive contributing factors for perceived health were being satisfied

with life, having an active life and not feeling helpless, whereas age was a

negative factor.

 

Conclusion.

Daily life is manageable for people in this context. Long-term oxygen

treatment and advanced age can be regarded as risk factors for perceiving ill health.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
United Kingdom: Blackwell Publishing, 2012
Keywords
appraisal of self-care agency scale, high-tech care, home ventilator
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-3133 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2648.2011.05781.x (DOI)000301426000009 ()
Note

Article first published online: 7 JUL 2011

Available from: 2011-01-27 Created: 2011-01-27 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Fossum, M., Söderhamn, O., Cliffordson, C. & Söderhamn, U. (2012). Translation and testing of the Risk Assessment Pressure Ulcer Sore scale used among residents in Norwegian nursing homes. BMJ Open, 2(5), e001575
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Translation and testing of the Risk Assessment Pressure Ulcer Sore scale used among residents in Norwegian nursing homes
2012 (English)In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 2, no 5, p. e001575-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The purpose of this study was to translate and test the psychometric properties of the Norwegian language version of the Risk Assessment Pressure Sore (RAPS) scale.

Background: Risk assessment scales for pressure ulcer (PU) prevention have become an aspect of quality improvement in healthcare, but their effectiveness depends on the reliability and validity of the scale.

Methods: A convenience sample of 481 residents in 15 nursing homes in rural Norway was included between January and June 2007. The English-language version of the RAPS scale was translated into Norwegian, and this scale was used to collect the data, including a skin  examination. The number of PUs and grades were documented. Reliability was assessed in a small group of 26 residents and construct validity in the total study group.

Results: Equivalence between two assessments regarding total scores of the RAPS scale was reflected in an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of 0.95. Construct validity was supported, and the RAPS scale could define groups with expected low and high scores. Further evidence of construct validity was shown in a confirmatory factor analysis.

Conclusion: The Norwegian version of the RAPS scale has shown sufficient psychometric properties to be considered a reliable and valid scale for identifying risk of PUs among nursing home residents. However, further testing is needed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Group, 2012
Keywords
Risk Assessment Pressure Sore (RAPS) scale
National Category
Other Medical Sciences
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-4765 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2012-001575 (DOI)000315053900088 ()2-s2.0-84869770857 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-10-26 Created: 2012-10-26 Last updated: 2015-09-15Bibliographically approved
Söderhamn, O., Björnestad, J. O., Skisland, A. & Cliffordson, C. (2011). Construct validity of the Moral Development Scale for Professionals (MDSP). Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare, 4, 165-170
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Construct validity of the Moral Development Scale for Professionals (MDSP)
2011 (English)In: Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare, ISSN 1178-2390, Vol. 4, p. 165-170Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to investigate the construct validity of the Moral Development Scale for Professionals (MDSP) using structural equation modeling. The instrument is a 12-item self-report instrument, developed in the Scandinavian cultural context and based on Kohlberg's theory. A hypothesized simplex structure model underlying the MDSP was tested through structural equation modeling. Validity was also tested as the proportion of respondents older than 20 years that reached the highest moral level, which according to the theory should be small. A convenience sample of 339 nursing students with a mean age of 25.3 years participated. Results confirmed the simplex model structure, indicating that MDSP reflects a moral construct empirically organized from low to high. A minority of respondents >20 years of age (13.5%) scored more than 80% on the highest moral level. The findings support the construct validity of the MDSP and the stages and levels in Kohlberg's theory

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Dove Medical Press Ltd., 2011
Keywords
Kohlberg, scale testing, simplex structure model, structural equation modeling
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-3907 (URN)10.2147/JMDH.S20075 (DOI)
Available from: 2011-12-19 Created: 2011-12-19 Last updated: 2015-10-14Bibliographically approved
Fex, A., Flensner, G., Ek, A.-C. & Söderhamn, O. (2011). Health–illness transition among persons using advanced medical technology at home. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 25(2), 253-261
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health–illness transition among persons using advanced medical technology at home
2011 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 253-261Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study aimed to elucidate meanings of health–illness transition experiences among adult persons using advanced medical technology at home. As an increasing number of persons perform self-care while using different sorts of advanced medical technology at home, knowledge about health–illness transition experiences in this situation may be useful to caregivers in supporting these patients. A qualitative design was used. Five women and five men, all of whom performed self-care at home, either using long-term oxygen therapy from a ventilator or oxygen cylinder, or performing peritoneal or haemodialysis, were interviewed. Ethics committee approval was obtained. Informed consent was received from all participants, and ethical issues concerning their rights in research were raised. The interviews were analysed using a phenomenological hermeneutical methodology, including both an inductive and a deductive structural analysis. This method offers possibilities to obtain an increased understanding by uncovering a deeper meaning of lived experiences through interviews transcribed as texts. The health–illness transition for adult persons in this context was found to mean a learning process of accepting, managing, adjusting and improving daily life with technology, facilitated by realizing the gain from technology at home. Further, the meaning of the health–illness transition experience was interpreted as contentment with being part of the active and conscious process towards transcending into a new state of living, in which the individual and the technology were in tune. The healthy transition experience was characterized by human growth and becoming. This study elucidates one meaning of health–illness transition experiences in relation to the use of advanced medical technology on a more generic level, independent of the specific type of technology used. A positive attitude towards technology at home facilitates the transition.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell, 2011
Keywords
acceptance, high-tech care, lived experience, phenomenological hermeneutics, self-care
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-2959 (URN)10.1111/j.1471-6712.2010.00820.x (DOI)
Available from: 2010-12-28 Created: 2010-12-28 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Fex, A., Flensner, G., Ek, A.-C. & Söderhamn, O. (2011). Living with an adult family member using advanced medical technology at home. Nursing Inquiry, 18(4), 336-347
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Living with an adult family member using advanced medical technology at home
2011 (English)In: Nursing Inquiry, ISSN 1320-7881, E-ISSN 1440-1800, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 336-347Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Living with an adult family member using advanced medical technology at home An increased number of chronically ill adults perform self-care while using different sorts of advanced medical technology at home. This hermeneutical study aimed to gain a deeper understanding of the meaning of living with an adult family member using advanced medical technology at home. Eleven next of kin to adults performing self-care at home, either using long-term oxygen from a cylinder or ventilator, or performing peritoneal or haemodialysis, were interviewed. The qualitative interviews were analysed using a Gadamerian methodology. The main interpretation explained the meaning as rhythmical patterns of connectedness versus separation, and of sorrow versus reconciliation. Dependence on others was shown in the need for support from healthcare professionals and significant others. In conclusion, next of kin took considerable responsibility for dependent-care. All next of kin were positive to the idea of bringing the technology home, even though their own needs receded into the background, while focusing on the best for the patient. The results were discussed in relation to dependent-care and transition, which may have an influence on the self-care of next of kin and patients. The study revealed a need for further nursing attention to next of kin in this context. 

Keywords
Dependent-care, Next of kin, Orem, Self-care, Transition
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-3131 (URN)10.1111/j.1440-1800.2011.00535.x (DOI)
Note
Epub 2011 Jul 10Available from: 2011-01-27 Created: 2011-01-27 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Söderhamn, O., Skisland, A. & Herrman, M. (2011). Self-care and anticipated transition into retirement and later life in a Nordic welfare context. Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare, 2011:4(4), 273-279
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-care and anticipated transition into retirement and later life in a Nordic welfare context
2011 (English)In: Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare, ISSN 1178-2390, E-ISSN 1178-2390, Vol. 2011:4, no 4, p. 273-279Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Abstract: Few studies have appeared in the health care literature on the meaning of transition into retirement and later life. However, this predictable-involuntary transition may influence personal health and well-being, and studying it from a self-care perspective could be useful. The aim of this study was to illuminate aspects of self-care in a group of middle-aged individuals in relation to their anticipated transition into retirement in the Nordic welfare context. A total of 13 individuals, aged 55 to 65 years, were randomly chosen from the total number of inhabitants in three municipalities in mid-west Sweden. Conversational interviews took place, during which the informants shared important events in their lives that had occurred from early childhood until the present time, together with thoughts about their anticipated future developmental transition into later life. The interviews were tape recorded and transcribed verbatim. After content analyses and interpretation, a comprehensive picture of the phenomenon was revealed. The results showed that there were opportunities, expectations, wishes, concerns, and worries related to the transition into retirement and old age among informants from both rural and urban municipalities. Self-care, in connection with this, depended on motivating and demotivating factors. Autonomy and mature dependence seemed to be positive driving forces for reaching a successful transition into later life. Supporting autonomy should be a way of facilitating the transition into retirement and later life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Albany, Auckland: Dove Medical Press, 2011
Keywords
aging, autonomy, motivation, older people, successful aging
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science; HUMANITIES, Cultural studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-3543 (URN)10.2147/JMDH.S21385 (DOI)
Projects
Äldres liv och villkor
Available from: 2011-08-25 Created: 2011-08-25 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
Flensner, G., Ek, A.-C., Söderhamn, O. & Landtblom, A.-M. (2011). Sensitivity to heat in MS patients: A factor strongly influencing symptomology - an explorative survey. BMC Neurology, 11(27)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sensitivity to heat in MS patients: A factor strongly influencing symptomology - an explorative survey
2011 (English)In: BMC Neurology, Vol. 11, no 27Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Many individuals diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) are sensitive to increased body temperature, which has been recognized as correlating with the symptom of fatigue. The need to explore this association has been highlighted. The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of heat sensitivity and its relations to disease course, disability, common MS-related symptoms and ongoing immunosuppressive treatments among individuals 65 years of age or younger diagnosed with MS.Methods: A cross-sectional designed survey was undertaken. A questionnaire was sent to MS-patients with an Expanded Disability Status Score (EDSS) in the interval of 0-6.5 and who were between 20 and 65 years of age, living in an eastern region of Sweden (n = 334). Besides occurrence of heat sensitivity (Yes/No) and corresponding questions, the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS), the MS-related symptom checklist and the Perceived Deficit Questionnaire (PDQ) were included. Data were analysed in relation to data level using Chi-square, Mann Whitney U-test, and Student's t-test. Pearson's and Spearman's correlations were calculated. In the logistic regression analyses (enter) dichotomized MS-symptoms were used as dependent variables, and EDSS, disease-course, time since onset, heat-sensitivity, age and sex (female/male) were independent variables. In the linear regression analyses, enter, mean FSS and summarized PDQ were entered as dependent variables and EDSS, disease-course, time since onset, heat sensitivity, age and sex (female/male) were independent variables.Results: Of the responding patients (n = 256), 58% reported heat sensitivity. The regression analyses revealed heat sensitivity as a significant factor relating not only to fatigue (p < 0.001), but also to several other common MS symptoms such as pain (p < 0.001), concentration difficulties (p < 0.001), and urination urgency (p = 0.009).Conclusions: Heat sensitivity in MS patients is a key symptom that is highly correlated with disabling symptoms such as fatigue, pain, concentration difficulty and urination urgency. © 2011 Flensner et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: BioMed Central, 2011
Keywords
adult, aged, article, chi square test, concentration loss, controlled study, correlation coefficient, cross-sectional study, dependent variable, disability, disease course, Expanded Disability Status Scale, fatigue, Fatigue Severity Scale, female, health survey, heat sensitivity, human, immunosuppressive treatment, independent variable, logistic regression analysis, major clinical study, male, multiple sclerosis, pain, perceived deficit questionnaire, questionnaire, rank sum test, rating scale, Student t test, Sweden, Symptom Checklist 90, urge incontinence
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-3307 (URN)10.1186/1471-2377-11-27 (DOI)14712377 (ISSN) (ISBN)
Available from: 2011-04-28 Created: 2011-04-28 Last updated: 2014-05-08Bibliographically approved
Söderhamn, O., Skisland, A. & Herrman, M. (2010). Attitudes towards the anticipated transition into retirement in the Nordic welfare context. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 19(Suppl 1), 129-129
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Attitudes towards the anticipated transition into retirement in the Nordic welfare context
2010 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 19, no Suppl 1, p. 129-129Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction:There may be different attitudes towards the transition into retirement and old age pensioner life among people who are relatively close to get into their third age. This phenomenon has not been widely studied in the nursing literature. Since this predictable-involuntary transition may have influences on personal health and well-being, it should be meaningful to study it in a self-care perspective. The aim of this study was to illuminate aspects of self-care in a group of middle-aged individuals in relation to their anticipated transition into retirement in the Nordic welfare context. Methods and Materials:A qualitative design was used in this  study. A total number of 13 individuals, 55–65 years of age, were randomly chosen from the total number of inhabitants in three municipalities in mid-west Sweden. The interviews were tape recorded and transcribed verbatim. After content analyses and interpretation, a comprehensive understanding of the phenomenon was revealed. Results: All informants viewed their lives in retrospective with  positive feelings with respect to their childhood and youth. As grown up individuals, they saw family, friends and social relations as very important. No particular differences between the informants from the different municipalities were found, nor in relation to age, sex or profession. There were opportunities, expectations, wishes, concerns and worries related to the transition into old age pensioner life among the informants from both the rural and urban municipalities. Conclusion: Autonomy and mature dependence seem to be positive driving forces for reaching a successful transition into old age. Supporting autonomy should, therefore, be a way for facilitating the predictable-involuntary transition into retirement. Further studies about the retirement transition within a self-care perspective are needed. This study indicates that motivation, autonomy and mature dependence are important issues that should be focused in such research. Gender issues and connectedness are other important areas.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Blackwell Scientific, 2010
Keywords
Retirement, age, pension, Sweden, self-care
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-2933 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2702.2010.03447.x (DOI)000281825400370 ()
Note
Special Issue: Fourth European Nursing Congress - Older Persons: the Future of Care (October 4-7 2010, Rotterdam, the Netherlands) Guest Editors: Cuno van Merwijk & Johan Lambregts : Parallel Session JAvailable from: 2010-12-15 Created: 2010-12-15 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3158-9981

Search in DiVA

Show all publications