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Eriksson, Kristina M.ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-8962-0924
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Publications (10 of 52) Show all publications
Eriksson, K. M., Carlsson, L. & Olsson, A. K. (2024). Exploring Socially Sustainable, Smart Manufacturing: Building Bridges Over Troubled Waters. In: Francisco J. G. Silva, Luís Pinto Ferreira, José Carlos Sá, Maria Teresa Pereira, Carla M. A. Pinto (Ed.), Flexible Automation and Intelligent Manufacturing: Establishing Bridges for More Sustainable Manufacturing Systems Proceedings of FAIM 2023, June 18–22, 2023, Porto, Portugal, Volume 2: Industrial Management: . Paper presented at FAIM 2023, June 18–22, 2023, Porto, Portugal, Volume 2: Industrial Management. Springer, 2
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring Socially Sustainable, Smart Manufacturing: Building Bridges Over Troubled Waters
2024 (English)In: Flexible Automation and Intelligent Manufacturing: Establishing Bridges for More Sustainable Manufacturing Systems Proceedings of FAIM 2023, June 18–22, 2023, Porto, Portugal, Volume 2: Industrial Management / [ed] Francisco J. G. Silva, Luís Pinto Ferreira, José Carlos Sá, Maria Teresa Pereira, Carla M. A. Pinto, Springer, 2024, Vol. 2Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Contemporary manufacturing organizations formulate strategies towards smart manufacturing. However, strategies often merely regard technological improvements of working processes and activities and pay limited attention to human-centric perspectives. This study addresses the complex phenomenon of reaching socially sustainable smart manufacturing by exploring the human-centric perspectives in the eras of Industry 4.0 and Industry 5.0. Data were collected through an explorative qualitative case study with focus groups applying the history wall approach to document informants’ choices of activities that impact digitalization. To investigate informants’ interpretations and experiences of digital initiatives and prospects, the history wall approach was coupled with the analytical lens of the co-workership wheel, with its four conceptual pairs: trust and openness, community spirit and cooperation, engagement and meaningfulness, responsibility, and initiative. A total of 17 informants from different organizational levels at a case company participated. Activities, impacting digitalization, brought forward were grouped into technology, organization, and external impact. Results showed that human-centric and intangible perspectives surfaced as prerequisites when navigating industrial digitalization. Further, digital initiatives and prospects risk drowning in re-occurring organizational changes making successful implementation difficult. Thus, organizations cannot rely solely on technology, but must consider activities related to organizational aspects and impacts from the external environment, when introducing digital initiatives. Intrinsically, recognition of the co-workership concept, emphasizing human-centricity, can support the foundation necessary for bridging the gap towards socially sustainable smart manufacturing and strengthening the emerging I5.0 research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2024
Series
Lecture Notes in Mechanical Engineering
Keywords
Social Sustainability, Smart Manufacturing, Human-Centric, Co-workership, Industrial Digitalization, Industry 5.0/4.0
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics Learning Work Sciences Business Administration
Research subject
Work Integrated Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-20899 (URN)10.1007/978-3-031-38165-2_96 (DOI)978-3-031-38164-5 (ISBN)978-3-031-38165-2 (ISBN)
Conference
FAIM 2023, June 18–22, 2023, Porto, Portugal, Volume 2: Industrial Management
Available from: 2023-11-02 Created: 2023-11-02 Last updated: 2023-11-10
Gharaibeh, L., Matarneh, S., Eriksson, K. M. & Lantz, B. (2023). Digital transformation of the wood construction supply chain through building information modelling: current state of practice. Construction Innovation, 24(7), 273-291
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Digital transformation of the wood construction supply chain through building information modelling: current state of practice
2023 (English)In: Construction Innovation, ISSN 1471-4175, E-ISSN 1477-0857, Vol. 24, no 7, p. 273-291Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: This study aims to present a state-of-the-art review of building information modelling (BIM) in the Swedish construction practice with a focus on wood construction. It focuses on examining the extent, maturity and actual practices of BIM in the Swedish wood construction industry, by analysing practitioners’ perspectives on the current state of BIM and its perceived benefits. Design/methodology/approach: A qualitative approach was selected, given the study’s exploratory character. Initially, an extensive review was undertaken to examine the current state of BIM utilisation and its associated advantages within the construction industry. Subsequently, empirical data were acquired through semi-structured interviews featuring open-ended questions, aimed at comprehensively assessing the prevailing extent of BIM integration within the Swedish wood construction sector. Findings: The research concluded that the wood construction industry in Sweden is shifting towards BIM on different levels, where in some cases, the level of implementation is still modest. It should be emphasised that the wood construction industry in Sweden is not realising the full potential of BIM. The industry is still using a combination of BIM and traditional methods, thus, limiting the benefits that full BIM implementation could offer the industry. Originality/value: This study provided empirical evidence on the current perceptions and state of practice of the Swedish wood construction industry regarding BIM maturity. © 2023, Lina Gharaibeh, Sandra Matarneh, Kristina Eriksson and Björn Lantz.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2023
Keywords
Architectural design; Information theory; Supply chains; Wood; Wooden construction; ’current; Building Information Modelling; Construction practice; Construction supply chain; Digital transformation; Digitalization; State of practise; State-of-the art reviews; Swedishs; Wood construction; Construction industry
National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics
Research subject
Production Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-21189 (URN)10.1108/CI-05-2023-0124 (DOI)001110550200001 ()2-s2.0-85178201575 (Scopus ID)
Note

CC BY 4.0

Available from: 2024-01-19 Created: 2024-01-19 Last updated: 2024-01-19Bibliographically approved
Schauerte, T. & Eriksson, K. M. (2023). Production Technology in the Wooden Single-Family House Industry: A Case of Reasoning against Automation. In: : . Paper presented at SWST 66th International Convention,25th - 30th June 2023, Asheville, North Carolina, USA.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Production Technology in the Wooden Single-Family House Industry: A Case of Reasoning against Automation
2023 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Swedish producers of wooden single-family houses have for a long time being accused of lagging behind other industries in terms of production technology. In the emergence and the spreading of concepts like Industry 4.0 or Smart Manufacturing, new technologies are available, with the respective automated equipment. Some companies have already invested in such, e.g., automatic stud fitting or multi-functional bridges. Others are about to do so, or at least seriously reason and reflect about it. In order to make an appropriate investment decision, a company has to consider different factors and thoroughly discuss and evaluate them internally. The aim of this single case study is to identify the factors the case company used as decision-criteria for investing in a higher degree of automation or not, and how the responsible managers reasoned on each factor before the final decision was made. The empirical material was gathered by deep interviews and the result shows seven factors of mportance: investment costs, operating costs, production capacity, flexibility, quality, spaceand working environment. After comprehensively debating and evaluating those factors, the company decided against a higher degree of automation in favor of more manual work. This shows that automated operations and the use of new technologies is no end in itself.

Keywords
Prefabrication, automation, operations management, wood building industry, decision criteria
National Category
Manufacturing, Surface and Joining Technology
Research subject
Production Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-20898 (URN)
Conference
SWST 66th International Convention,25th - 30th June 2023, Asheville, North Carolina, USA
Available from: 2023-11-02 Created: 2023-11-02 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
Rosenbäck, R. & Eriksson, K. M. (2023). Use of dynamic capability framework as management strategy at healthcare providers in a crisis. In: : . Paper presented at 30th EurOMA Conference 2023, 1-6 July,Leuven, Belgium.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Use of dynamic capability framework as management strategy at healthcare providers in a crisis
2023 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Keywords
dynamic capabilities, healthcare, COVID-19 pandemic
National Category
Business Administration Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-20786 (URN)
Conference
30th EurOMA Conference 2023, 1-6 July,Leuven, Belgium
Available from: 2023-10-18 Created: 2023-10-18 Last updated: 2024-01-18Bibliographically approved
Olsson, A. K., Eriksson, K. M. & Carlsson, L. (2022). A co-workership approach on digital transformation: Towards smart manufacturing. In: Proceedings of the International Association for Computer Information Systems - Europe June 23, 2022: Virtual Conference. Paper presented at The International Association for Computer Information Systems - Europe June 23, 2022 - Virtual Conference. International Association for Computer Information Systems
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A co-workership approach on digital transformation: Towards smart manufacturing
2022 (English)In: Proceedings of the International Association for Computer Information Systems - Europe June 23, 2022: Virtual Conference, International Association for Computer Information Systems, 2022Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Digital transformation refers to the process of organizational change, evolving over time for value creation and appropriation aiding for smart manufacturing (Skog, 2019). Regarding the role of organizational means, there is an embedded dynamic generator of challenges, opportunities, and resources that affect the digital transformation at various organizational levels related to social factors such as values, culture, and trust (Ibid). Earlier studies of the Swedish manufacturing industry imply that as the number of digital technologies increase within organizations, while striving towards becoming a smart factory, cooperation and social factors become more imperative (Björkdahl, 2020). By following this reasoning, understanding organizational prerequisites that facilitate the human-centric perspective in relation to digital transformation is crucial when approaching smart manufacturing by moving from Industry 4.0 (I4.0) towards Industry 5.0 (I5.0) (Navarandi, 2019). It is argued that a prerequisite for digital transformation is the employees’ ability to cross organizational boundaries both horizontally and vertically (Carlsson et al., 2022) challenging management. The aim of this study is to explore organizational prerequisites for co-workership in digital transformation towards smart manufacturing. The concept of the co-workership wheel reflects the employee as an autonomous actor within the organization. As such, co-workership is vital for managing organizational change, e.g., digital transformation, capturing employees’ initiatives and prospects (Andersson, et al. 2021). As illustrated in Figure 1 the co-workership wheel consists of four conceptual pairs: Trust and Openness; Community Spirit and Cooperation; Engagement and Meaningfulness; Responsibility and Initiative. Together these four pairs describe the foundation for co-workership within the organization, feedbacking a development process towards smart manufacturing.

Inspired by the application of the co-workership wheel in the health care sector (ibid), this study builds on previous work by Carlsson et al. (2022) to further contribute to the exploration of co-workership in the manufacturing sector strengthening the I5.0 emerging research. By applying a qualitative case-study, organizational prerequisites for co-workership in digital transformation are explored (Yin, 2018). The term co-worker is herein applied in a general sense to explore employees’ experiences covering both managerial levels and service functions. The case company is a large manufacturing organization in the Swedish energy sector. In-depth interviews (n=29) were conducted over nine months (Oct. 20 – Jun. 21), exploring co-workers' current and retrospective experiences of the early phases of digital transformation. Referral sampling was applied for selecting informants from functions such as design, quality, production, logistics, digitalization development leaders, and corporate service functions including HR, IT, and financial controllers. Access was granted to six internal documents guiding all employees covering the organization’s strategic work with industrial digitalization, vision, and core values: responsibility, excellence, and innovation. Several rounds of data analysis followed, identifying organizational prerequisites related to each of the four conceptual pairs (Andersson et al., 2020) through a coding scheme based on the co-workership wheel, Findings show that employees interpreted digital transformation as difficult to navigate due to limited communication and cooperation across the organization. Furthermore, the need for trust in digital technologies and employee engagement for transformation are emphasized by informants. Thus, it is argued that an adaptive organizational culture and a focus on learning and competence are necessary organizational prerequisites for translating the means of digital transformation. Managers in the manufacturing sector hence need awareness and understanding of when and how to apply co-workership for transformational change. Manufacturing cultures need to absorb a more human-centric perspective when navigating I4.0, moving in incremental steps encompassing the whole organization, rather than treating digital transformation as scattered and disruptive activities. We argue that the findings give useful implications for manufacturing organizations navigating the challenges of digital transformation to reach the benefits of smart manufacturing. As digital transformation cuts across organizational structures and working processes, there is a need to highlight a human-centric perspective on smart manufacturing by applying the conceptual pairs of the co-workership wheel. Lessons learned show that by applying a co-workership approach with its aspects of trust and openness, community spirit and cooperation, engagement and meaningfulness, responsibility and initiatives, management needs to encourage organizational prerequisites such as an adaptive culture and learning and competence for reaching and sustaining a human-centric perspective on digital transformation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
International Association for Computer Information Systems, 2022
Keywords
smart manufacturing, digital transformation, co-workership, human-centric, industry 4.0, industry 5.0
National Category
Business Administration Information Systems, Social aspects Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Production Technology; Work Integrated Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-19417 (URN)
Conference
The International Association for Computer Information Systems - Europe June 23, 2022 - Virtual Conference
Note

 The study was carried out within the AHIL-project, Artificial and Human Intelligence through Learning, funded by the Swedish Knowledge Foundation and University West

Available from: 2022-12-01 Created: 2022-12-01 Last updated: 2023-06-02Bibliographically approved
Gharaibeh, L., Matarneh, S. T., Eriksson, K. M. & Lantz, B. (2022). An Empirical Analysis of Barriers to Building Information Modelling (BIM) Implementation in Wood Construction Projects: Evidence from the Swedish Context. Buildings, 12(8), 1067-1067
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An Empirical Analysis of Barriers to Building Information Modelling (BIM) Implementation in Wood Construction Projects: Evidence from the Swedish Context
2022 (English)In: Buildings, E-ISSN 2075-5309, Vol. 12, no 8, p. 1067-1067Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Building information modelling is gradually being recognised by the architecture, engineering, construction, and operation industry as a valuable opportunity to increase the efficiency of the built environment. Focusing on the wood construction industry, BIM is becoming a necessity; this is due to its high level of prefabrication and complex digital procedures using wood sawing machines and sophisticated cuttings. However, the full implementation of BIM is still far from reality. The main objective of this paper is to explore the barriers affecting BIM implementation in the Swedish construction industry. An extensive literature review was conducted to extract barriers hindering the implementation of BIM in the construction industry. Secondly, barriers to the implementation of BIM in the wood construction industry in Sweden were extracted using the grounded theory methodology to analyse expert input on the phenomenon of low BIM implementation in the wood construction industry in Sweden. Thirty-four barriers were identified. The analysis of this study also led to the development of a conceptual model that recommended solutions to overcome the barriers identified to help maximise BIM implementation within the wood construction industry. Identifying the main barriers affecting BIM implementation is essential to guide organisational decisions and drive policy, particularly for governments that are considering articulating regulations to expand BIM implementation. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abbaye de Maredsous, 2022
Keywords
building information modelling (BIM); wood construction; grounded theory
National Category
Building Technologies
Research subject
Production Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-19150 (URN)10.3390/buildings12081067 (DOI)
Available from: 2022-09-19 Created: 2022-09-19 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, K. M., Alsaleh, A., Behzad Far, S. & Stjern, D. (2022). Applying Digital Twin Technology in Higher Education: An Automation Line Case Study. Advances in Transdisciplinary Engineering, 21, 461-472
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Applying Digital Twin Technology in Higher Education: An Automation Line Case Study
2022 (English)In: Advances in Transdisciplinary Engineering, ISSN 2352-751X, Vol. 21, p. 461-472Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Abstract. Production systems are being expanded to include Digital Twins (DTs)

as part of increased industrial digitalization. DTs can bring benefits e.g., increase

visibility, safety, and accessibility of the system. Further, digital experimentation

can reduce time and cost. Though, application of DT technologies involves

challenges i.e., model accuracy or errors in transferring data or codes between the

DT and the physical twin. Many studies on DTs focus on industrial applications.

However, DT technology has potential for implementation of digital labs in

education. This aspect of DTs is of rising importance as distance education has

increased over the last decade and access to physical laboratories can be restricted

due to factors such as the Covid-19 pandemic. Thus, there is a need to study the use

of DT technology in higher education. To address this, we investigate possibilities

and challenges of applying DT technology in education to conduct industrial-like

labs virtually. A case of an automation line, with full scale industrial equipment,

based at a research center, is focused. Results emphasize that the application of DT

technologies require multi-domain expertise to understand the consequences of

every single decision in the design process on every piece of equipment involved,

making the modelling process complex and time consuming. Thus, when applied in

education, test procedures need to be designed to focus on students’ motivation,

improved learning and understanding of production systems. DTs are considered

enabling technologies supporting the concept of Industry 5.0, thus stressing the

human-centric aspects of advancing Industry 4.0. The predicted application of DTs

emphasizes the need for educational curricula that include laboratory applications

and theoretic understanding of DT technologies. This study focusses the application

of DT technologies in higher education curricula, but the result of the study can

contribute to other areas such as automation and virtual commissioning towards

smarter manufacturing

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IOS Press, 2022
Keywords
digital twin, cyber-physical, seamless transfer, virtual labs, virtual commissioning
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Production Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-18412 (URN)10.3233/atde220165 (DOI)
Note

The study was carried out within the AHIL-project, Artificial and Human Intelligence through Learning, funded by the Swedish Knowledge Foundation and University West

Available from: 2022-05-23 Created: 2022-05-23 Last updated: 2023-02-27
Gharaibeh, L., Eriksson, K. M. & Lantz, B. (2022). Building Information Modelling in the wood construction industry: Challenges and level of implementation. In: : . Paper presented at Brilliance in resilience:operations and supply chain management’s role in achieving a sustainable future; 1-6 July 2022, University of Sussex, Business School, Berlin, Deutschland - programme Constantin Blome, Conference Chair (pp. 33). , Article ID 5. July.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Building Information Modelling in the wood construction industry: Challenges and level of implementation
2022 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Building information modelling (BIM) is becoming a necessity for the wood construction industry, this is due to its high level of prefabrication and complex digital procedures using wood sawing machines and sophisticated cuttings. This research examines the levelof BIM implementation in the wood construction industry in Sweden from industry experts prospective. Data was collected through interviews with industrial practitioners and academics. This research provides an important list of challenges that need to be considered to increase the level of BIM implementation in the wood construction industry. The research also provides recommendations for future research to aid in increasing the level of BIM implementation in the wood construction industry in Sweden.

Keywords
Wood construction, Building information modelling (BIM), Wood supply chain
National Category
Economics Information Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-18865 (URN)
Conference
Brilliance in resilience:operations and supply chain management’s role in achieving a sustainable future; 1-6 July 2022, University of Sussex, Business School, Berlin, Deutschland - programme Constantin Blome, Conference Chair
Available from: 2022-09-29 Created: 2022-09-29 Last updated: 2023-01-04Bibliographically approved
Muniz, J., Eriksson, K. M., Valemtim, M. L., Ramasamy, S., Shotaro, Y., Marins, F. A. .., . . . Zhang, Y. (2022). Challenges of Engineering Education 5.0 based on I4.0 Policies in Brazil, India, Japan, and Sweden. In: International Conference on Work Integrated Learning: Abstract Book. Paper presented at WIL'22 7-9 December 2022, International Conference on Work Integrated Learning, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden (pp. 95-96). Trollhättan: University West
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Challenges of Engineering Education 5.0 based on I4.0 Policies in Brazil, India, Japan, and Sweden
Show others...
2022 (English)In: International Conference on Work Integrated Learning: Abstract Book, Trollhättan: University West , 2022, p. 95-96Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Industry and academia have placed increasing attention on implementing Industry 4.0 (I4.0) in the production ofgoods and services. Named as Industry 4.0 in Brazil, Made in India in India, Society 5.0 in Japan, andProduktion2030 in Sweden (Ribeiro et al., 2022). Hereafter, we apply I4.0 to simplify, which promises customizedproducts produced in smaller lots, and that repetitive manufacturing tasks can be automated very soon (Karre etal., 2017).Country policies play an important role in pushing different sectors of the economy, aligned as new with theregulatory framework of national and international trade, especially industrial (Aguinis et al., 2020). The implementation of I4.0 literature indicates different specificities in each country, including culture, R&D targets,education and vocational training, and their research opportunities related to how I4.0 affects workers (Jerman etal., 2020). The research-question is: How do different countries approach the opportunities and challenges of Engineering Education 4.0 through similar or different country policies?This study aims to discuss engineering education related to I4.0 policies. This discussion is based on policies fromBrazil, India, Japan, and Sweden related to education and workers 5.0, which include students and employees.Investigating how these countries are adjusting to I4.0 is relevant for national industrial sectors to wish to actefficiently in this new technological context. Industry 4.0 demands new professional skills and will impactemployment. It is noteworthy that this research is in line with the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) proposedby the United Nations (UN): Quality Education (SDG-4); o Decent Work and Economic Growth (SDG-8); andIndustry, Innovation, and Infrastructure (ODS-9) which seeks to promote inclusive and sustainableindustrialization and foster innovation. This research aims to contribute to sustainable o rganizational practices;formulation of public policies that alleviate social problems; guidance of professional curricula affected by I 4.0.

Papers and Data Selection: A literature search was conducted in the Scopus database, which gathers some of the most important journalsrelated to manufacturing technologies with high impact factors, based on the PRISMA method, which refers to aminimum set of evidence-based items to report studies in systematic reviews and meta -analyses (MOHER et al.,2009). The paper set was assembled from the Scopus core collection, using the following search string: “industry4.0” OR “industry 5.0” AND “policies” AND ". The results were narrowed to texts in English, which yielded 1496papers. All titles and abstracts were read, which resulted in a set composed of 14 papers. We also use official documents relating to I4.0 raised from official government websites.

Comparison of Countries’ Education policies and Industry 4.0: The literature addresses difficulties associated with the implementation of I4.0 in emerging economies (Dalagnore,2018; Hong and Muniz Jr., 2022). Not surprisingly, current literature I4.0 related to technology adoption is themost prevalent theme discussed from a hard, technology-oriented perspective rather than a people-oriented.Production systems are sociotechnical systems, with an explicit understanding that all systems involve ongoinginteractions between people and technology, and they are rapidly transforming virtually all areas of human life,work, and interaction.The European Commission’s (Breque et al., 2021) vision for ‘Industry 5.0’ proposes moves past a narrow andtraditional focus on technology-or economic enabled growth of the existing extractive, production andconsumption driven economic model to a more transformative view of growth that is focused on human progressand well-being based on reducing and shifting consumption to new forms of sustainable, circular and regenerativeeconomic value creation and equitable prosperity. This Human-centric production system design and managementapproach (Industry 5.0) is necessary to support skill development, learning, continuous improvement andcollaboration in the organization (Ribeiro et al., 2022).

Conclusion: Brazil, India, Japan and Sweden create policies to support their own technological independence. All countriesindicate concern about education and development of skills related to I4.0.It can be concluded that the four countries studied from the perspective of Industry 4.0 an d Engineering Education4.0 are all embarking on their journeys towards increased digitalization in industry and society as a whole. Therealization of the human-centered Society 5.0 was realized and highlighted comparatively early for Japan, whereasin the Europe Union and thus in Sweden the focus of the importance of Industry 5.0 development in parallelIndustry 4.0 has risen up since year 2021.The results indicate that although there are many initiatives of meeting the needs for new competence andknowledge in the era of I4.0 to accommodate Engineering Education 4.0 there are still challenges for futureresearch to move forward in the nexus between I4.0 and I5.0. The result, of studying different countries'policies, highlights that it is imperative, when approaching novel technologies in I4.0 and designing Engineering Education 4.0, to in parallel consider technological implementations with the inclusion of I5.0 aspects and humancentric perspectives.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Trollhättan: University West, 2022
Keywords
Engineering Education, Policy, Cross-Country, Industry 5.0
National Category
Manufacturing, Surface and Joining Technology Learning Work Sciences
Research subject
Production Technology; Work Integrated Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-19513 (URN)9789189325302 (ISBN)
Conference
WIL'22 7-9 December 2022, International Conference on Work Integrated Learning, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden
Note

This work was supported by the Sao Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP, #2021/10944-2); and Coordination ofSuperior Level Staff Improvement (CAPES, #88887.310463/2018-00)

Available from: 2023-01-02 Created: 2023-01-02 Last updated: 2023-06-02Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, K. M. & Lycke, L. (2022). Changing traditional academic structures to meet new competence needs in industry Selected thematic track: Perspectives on collaboration for sustainable organisational learning. In: : . Paper presented at The Organisational Learning, Knowledge and Capabilities, OLKC conference 2022, 7-9 September, Trollhättan, Sweden (pp. 1-1).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changing traditional academic structures to meet new competence needs in industry Selected thematic track: Perspectives on collaboration for sustainable organisational learning
2022 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Purpose New technological advancements and global societal changes continuously reshapes manufacturing industry creating increasing competence needs for professionals, as new skill needs, both up-skilling and re-skilling are evolving simultaneously (European Commission, 2021). Thus, industry is struggling with skill shortages at the same time as higher educational institutions (HEIs) traditionally are not structurally organised to design for and meet the new educational demands that are progressively surfacing. Those challenges are addressed here by depicting a case where a Swedish university in collaboration with around 50 external partners, mainly from the manufacturing industry, have co-produced an educational model with short courses, at master level, targeting competence development of professionals (Hattinger and Eriksson, 2020). Such models have evolved over the past decade (Kashyap and Agrawal, 2019) with the content of the courses consecutively adapted to the shifts in industry competence needs (Eriksson et al., 2021). Those initiatives have seen many phases, e.g., calibration of co-production activities between industry and academia (Brunel et al., 2010; Holland, 2019; Sannö et al., 2019) and finding suitable course formats for professionals (Hattinger and Eriksson, 2015). However, the aspects of corresponding and necessary organisational changes to traditional academic structures to successfully encompass such new educational models into the regular education prospects is still challenging and thus needs further understanding. The new educational models mean changes to many functions within HEIs, emphasising that knowledge between functions needs to be transferred, shared, and exchanged. Hence, the aim is to study the changes in the organisation's knowledge from the perspective of organisational learning (Argote, 2013). Following this, the research question asked is: How can academic structural changes, for creating an agile and sustainable university educational model meeting industrial competence needs in a changing society, be understood from the perspective of organisational learning? Case description and outline of the study The case focuses on an educational model developed in co-production between academia and industry, spanning the years 2013-2020. The model is designed with short courses in hybrid format of 2.5 European Credits (ECTS) given over five weeks in the field of production technology. Competence needs and co-production between university and industry has been studied over the years (Hattinger and Eriksson, 2020). However, it is realised that it is essential with joint refection among different functions at HEIs for facilitating organisational changes of traditional academic structures . . .

Keywords
Work Integrated Learning, WIL, Organisational Learning, Industry-Academic Collaboration, Lifelong Learning, Competence Developmen
National Category
Learning Pedagogy
Research subject
Work Integrated Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-20785 (URN)
Conference
The Organisational Learning, Knowledge and Capabilities, OLKC conference 2022, 7-9 September, Trollhättan, Sweden
Available from: 2023-11-15 Created: 2023-11-15 Last updated: 2024-02-15
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-8962-0924

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