Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Publications (10 of 25) Show all publications
Grankvist, G., Johnsen, S. Å. & Hanss, D. (2019). Values and willingness-to-pay for sustainability-certified mobile phones. International Journal of Sustainable Development and World Ecology, 26(7), 657-664
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Values and willingness-to-pay for sustainability-certified mobile phones
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Sustainable Development and World Ecology, ISSN 1350-4509, E-ISSN 1745-2627, Vol. 26, no 7, p. 657-664Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigated whether endorsement of personal values is associated with willingness to pay more for mobile phones with an environmental or social sustainability label. Participants were students in Sweden, Norway and Germany. A self-report inventory was used to measure willingness to pay and the importance attached to values of Schwartz’s circular model. In Sweden and Norway, participants were willing to pay, on average, 18% extra for a mobile phone with labels for environmental or social sustainability. In Germany, the corresponding share was 12%. To strive for self-enhancement values, that is, social status and prestige, as well as control and dominance over people and resources, was associated with a lower willingness to pay for mobile phones with labels for environmental or social sustainability in all three countries. Furthermore, women were willing to pay more than men for mobile phones with both kinds of sustainability labels. In Sweden and Norway, participants were, on average, willing to pay more for a mobile phone with a label for social sustainability compared to a mobile phone with a label for environmental sustainability. © 2019 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

National Category
Environmental Management Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Telecommunications Occupational Health and Environmental Health Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-14469 (URN)10.1080/13504509.2019.1652212 (DOI)2-s2.0-85070978152 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-10-02 Created: 2019-10-02 Last updated: 2019-10-02
Johansson, A.-C., Axelsson, M., Grankvist, G., Berndtsson, I. & Brink, E. (2018). Symptoms, Illness Perceptions, Self-Efficacy and Health-Related Quality of Life Following Colorectal Cancer Treatment. Open Journal of Nursing, 8(9), 591-604
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Symptoms, Illness Perceptions, Self-Efficacy and Health-Related Quality of Life Following Colorectal Cancer Treatment
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 8, no 9, p. 591-604Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Lower health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is associated with fatigue, poor mental and poor gastrointestinal health during the first three months after colorectal cancer (CRC) treatment. Research indicates that maintaining usual activities has a positive impact on HRQoL after treatment for CRC. Illness perceptions have been associated with HRQoL in other cancer diseases, and self-efficacy has been associated with HRQoL in gastrointestinal cancer survivors. Our knowledge about illness perceptions and self-efficacy in relation to maintaining everyday activities and HRQoL following CRC treatment is incomplete. Aim: To explore associations between HRQoL, fatigue, mental health, gastrointestinal health, illness perceptions and self-efficacy in relation to maintaining everyday activities, three months after surgical CRC treatment. A further aim was to test the Maintain Function Scale in a CRC population. Method: The study was cross-sectional. Forty-six persons participated. Data were collected using questionnaires. Descriptive and analytical statistics were used. Results: Persons who were more fatigued, depressed, worried, and had more diarrhea were more likely to report lower HRQoL. Increased fatigue and diarrhea were associated with decreased HRQoL. Concerning illness perceptions, persons who reported negative emotions and negative consequences of CRC were more likely to report lower HRQoL. Persons scoring higher on self-efficacy were more likely to report higher HRQoL. Increased self-efficacy was associated with increased HRQoL. The Maintain Function Scale was suitable for assessing self-efficacy in relation to maintaining everyday activities. Conclusions: Nursing support to improve self-efficacy and illness perceptions and to minimize symptoms during recovery should have a favorable impact on HRQoL.

Keywords
Colorectal Cancer, Health-Related Quality of Life, Illness Perceptions, Recovery, Self-Efficacy
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-12949 (URN)10.4236/ojn.2018.89044 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-09-27 Created: 2018-09-27 Last updated: 2019-05-24Bibliographically approved
Grankvist, G. & Löfvendahl, E. (2016). Arbetsintegrerat lärande (AIL) som en ekvation. In: Kristina Johansson (Ed.), ViLär 2016, konferens 8-9 december 2016, Vänersborg: . Paper presented at ViLär 8-9 december 2016 - en nationell konferens inom verksamhetsintegrerat lärande 2016, Vänersborg, Sweden.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Arbetsintegrerat lärande (AIL) som en ekvation
2016 (Swedish)In: ViLär 2016, konferens 8-9 december 2016, Vänersborg / [ed] Kristina Johansson, 2016Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Keywords
WIL; work-integrated learning, AIL; arbetsintegrerat lärande
National Category
Work Sciences
Research subject
Work Integrated Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-10438 (URN)
Conference
ViLär 8-9 december 2016 - en nationell konferens inom verksamhetsintegrerat lärande 2016, Vänersborg, Sweden
Available from: 2016-12-29 Created: 2016-12-29 Last updated: 2016-12-29Bibliographically approved
Grankvist, G. (2016). Examensarbete på personalvetarprogrammet: en modell att bygga vidare på. In: Kristina Johansson (Ed.), ViLär 2016, konferens 8-9 december 2016, Vänersborg: . Paper presented at ViLär 8-9 december 2016 - en nationell konferens inom verksamhetsintegrerat lärande 2016, Vänersborg, Sweden.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Examensarbete på personalvetarprogrammet: en modell att bygga vidare på
2016 (Swedish)In: ViLär 2016, konferens 8-9 december 2016, Vänersborg / [ed] Kristina Johansson, 2016Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Keywords
WIL, work-integrated learning, AIL; arbetsintegrerat lärande
National Category
Work Sciences
Research subject
Work Integrated Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-10439 (URN)
Conference
ViLär 8-9 december 2016 - en nationell konferens inom verksamhetsintegrerat lärande 2016, Vänersborg, Sweden
Available from: 2016-12-29 Created: 2016-12-29 Last updated: 2016-12-29Bibliographically approved
Grankvist, G., Kajonius, P. & Persson, B. (2016). The Relationship between Mind-Body Dualism and Personal Values. International Journal of Psychological Studies, 8(2), 126-132
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Relationship between Mind-Body Dualism and Personal Values
2016 (English)In: International Journal of Psychological Studies, ISSN 1918-7211, E-ISSN 1918-722X, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 126-132Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Dualists view the mind and the body as two fundamental different “things”, equally real and independent of each other. Cartesian thought, or substance dualism, maintains that the mind and body are two different substances, the non-physical and the physical, and a causal relationship is assumed to exist between them. Physicalism, on the other hand, is the idea that everything that exists is either physical or totally dependent of and determined by physical items. Hence, all mental states are fundamentally physical states. In the current study we investigated to what degree Swedish university students’ beliefs in mind-body dualism is explained by the importance they attach to personal values. A self-report inventory was used to measure their beliefs and values. Students who held stronger dualistic beliefs attach less importance to the power value (i.e., the effort to achieve social status, prestige, and control or dominance over people and resources). This finding shows that the strength in laypeople’s beliefs in dualism is partially explained by the importance they attach to personal values.

Keywords
mind-body problem, dualism, physicalism, personal values
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
SOCIAL SCIENCE, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-9351 (URN)10.5539/ijps.v8n2p126 (DOI)
Note

Copyright for this article is retained by the author(s), with first publication rights granted to the journal.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attributionlicense (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/).

Available from: 2016-05-25 Created: 2016-05-25 Last updated: 2019-05-15
Grankvist, G. (2015). An Examination of Swedish Human Resource Management Students' Beliefs about What Work Should Ideally Be Like. International Journal of Social Science Studies, 3(4), 166-171
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An Examination of Swedish Human Resource Management Students' Beliefs about What Work Should Ideally Be Like
2015 (English)In: International Journal of Social Science Studies, ISSN 2324-8033, E-ISSN 2324-8041, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 166-171Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Human Resource Management students' beliefs about how work should be organised will influence their behaviour in future professional positions. This prompted a study in which students in a three-year programme in Human Resource Management at University West in Sweden commented on a number of statements about what work should ideally be like. All 140 respondents were born between 1978 and 1990 and hence belong to Generation Y, also known as Generation Me. The respondents generally agreed strongly with humanistic beliefs about work and female students agreed with humanistic beliefs to a far greater extent than male students.

Keywords
Beliefs about work, Generation Y, Human Resource Management students, Sweden
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
SOCIAL SCIENCE, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-8719 (URN)10.11114/ijsss.v3i4.917 (DOI)
Available from: 2015-11-26 Created: 2015-11-26 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Grankvist, G. (2015). Attitudes towards Fairtrade Principles and Environmental Views among the Inhabitants of a Rural Swedish Town. Psychology, 6(13), 1661-1667
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Attitudes towards Fairtrade Principles and Environmental Views among the Inhabitants of a Rural Swedish Town
2015 (English)In: Psychology, ISSN 2152-7180, E-ISSN 2152-7199, Vol. 6, no 13, p. 1661-1667Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper evaluates associations between values and preference for the Fairtrade concept andcompares the ecocentric and anthroprocentric views of Nature. The intention of Fairtrade productlabelling is to increase consumers' awareness of products that have a presumably more positiveinfluence on workers' lives in developing countries. The ecocentric view assumes that Nature hasan intrinsic value and should be preserved regardless of economic implications. The anthropocentricview, on the other hand, assumes Nature has value only because of the material, physical,or other benefits Nature provides humans. All respondents in the study were residents of Gestad, asmall town in a sparsely populated area of Sweden. Among the main results of the study was thatself-transcendence values (e.g., universalism and benevolence) were positively correlated with apreference for Fairtrade and ecocentrism, and negatively correlated with anthropocentrism. Conservationvalues (e.g., tradition and conformity) were positively correlated with anthropocentrism,and negatively correlated with a preference for Fairtrade. Another result was that women weremore positive than men towards Fairtrade and ecocentrism.

Keywords
Personal Values, Fairtrade, Ecocentrism, Anthroprocentrism
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
SOCIAL SCIENCE, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-8720 (URN)10.4236/psych.2015.613162 (DOI)
Available from: 2015-11-26 Created: 2015-11-26 Last updated: 2019-05-13Bibliographically approved
Grankvist, G. (2015). Beliefs in dualism and personal values. In: : . Paper presented at Toward a Science of Consciousness 2015, Helsingfors, Finland, 9 – 12 juni 2015.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Beliefs in dualism and personal values
2015 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Dualists view mind and body as two fundamentally different kinds of “things”. Mind and the physical body are viewed as equally real and neither of them is, in a primal way, thought to be dependent on the other. Cartesian or “substance” dualism include the idea that mind and body belong to two different substances, the non-physical and the physical. These two substances are furthermore thought to influence each other causally. Physicalism, on the other hand, is the notion that everything is physical or totally dependent of and determined by physical items. In this view everything in the world is composed by the same kind of substance, which is physical or material. All mental states are hence fundamentally physical states. In the current study Swedish university students views on the mind-body relationship as well as the importance they attached to different personal values were measured using a self-report inventory. Students that attached more importance to the power value; that is to strive for social status and prestige, and control or dominance over people and resources, were found to hold stronger non-dualistic or physicalistic views on the mind-body relationship. If similar results in future studies of professional philosophers should be found it would challenge the idea that philosophical arguments and opinions is something “above” or “are unaffected by” psychological factors such as personal values.

National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
SOCIAL SCIENCE, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-8652 (URN)
Conference
Toward a Science of Consciousness 2015, Helsingfors, Finland, 9 – 12 juni 2015
Available from: 2015-11-12 Created: 2015-11-12 Last updated: 2016-11-21Bibliographically approved
Grankvist, G. & Kajonius, P. (2015). Personality traits and personal values: A replication with a Swedish sample. International Journal of Personality Psychology, 1(1), 8-14
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Personality traits and personal values: A replication with a Swedish sample
2015 (English)In: International Journal of Personality Psychology, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 8-14Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To maintain rigor and transparency in the science of personality psychology, we conducted a replication of the often cited “The Big Five Personality Factors and Personal Values” by Roccas, Sagiv, Schwartz, and Knafo (2002). More than a decade ago, based on a study of Israeli students, they presented results on how personality traits and personal values relate. In the current replication study with Swedish students, we related the Big Five personality traits to Schwartz´s personal values. Our results replicated most of the earlier findings. Whereas the earlier study tested the predictive validity of traits and values on religious beliefs, presumed to be under a relatively high degree of cognitive control, our study tested the willingness-to-pay for Fairtrade alternatives. Our findings confirmed the earlier findings that personal values explain substantially more variance than personality traits in this. We discuss that traits and values are different constructs and that their relationship is consistent across the two geographic locations and student cohorts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
University of Groningen, 2015
Keywords
Personality traits, personal values, willingness-to-pay, Fairtrade alternatives
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
SOCIAL SCIENCE, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-8655 (URN)
Available from: 2015-11-12 Created: 2015-11-12 Last updated: 2019-05-14Bibliographically approved
Kajonius, P. & Grankvist, G. (2015). The Impact of Personality Traits, Values, and Abilities on the View of Uniqueness of Consciousness. In: Towards a Science of Consciousness: Book of Abstracts. Paper presented at Towards a Science of Consciousness, University of Helsinki, Finland, 9-13 June 2015 (pp. 315-no. 284). Helsingfors
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Impact of Personality Traits, Values, and Abilities on the View of Uniqueness of Consciousness
2015 (English)In: Towards a Science of Consciousness: Book of Abstracts, Helsingfors, 2015, p. 315-no. 284Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Personality traits, including the well-known Big Five traits, the subclinical Dark Triad traits, as well as cognitive (IQ) and emotional abilities (EQ), are known to predict a number of attitudes, such as views of politics, importance of other people, or interest in self. This present study set out to research the impact of personality traits on the view of consciousness, the main question being whether consciousness sets mankind apart from the animal kingdom. A Swedish sample was tested on six different personality-related tests measuring traits, values, and abilities. The results showed that high scorers in emotional intelligence, openness and extraversion had a view of consciousness being unique for human beings only. Furthermore, people high on self-enhancing values and the tendency to manipulate others (Machiavellianism) also held a view of consciousness being unique for human beings, and which sets us apart from animals. Only self-transcending values, such as universalism, showed a negative association with the uniqueness of consciousness. The discussion extends to how the view on consciousness affects other outlooks on life, such as the view on one’s personal future or mankind’s environmental predicament. Motivational agendas stemming from personality traits, in terms of stable, genetical influences, might explain views on ontological questions to a greater degree than previously thought.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Helsingfors: , 2015
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
SOCIAL SCIENCE, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-8644 (URN)
Conference
Towards a Science of Consciousness, University of Helsinki, Finland, 9-13 June 2015
Available from: 2015-01-12 Created: 2015-11-12 Last updated: 2016-11-21Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1673-6288

Search in DiVA

Show all publications