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Dåderman, Anna MariaORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8562-5610
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Publications (10 of 77) Show all publications
Dåderman, A. M., Hallberg, A., Skog, S. & Kajonius, P. (2019). A Leadership Meta-Resource Factor Explicates Task Performance, Work Engagement, and Perceived Stress. In: : . Paper presented at Perpsy19 World Conference on Personality, 2-6 April 2019, Hanoi, Vietnam.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Leadership Meta-Resource Factor Explicates Task Performance, Work Engagement, and Perceived Stress
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Past research links emotional leadership resources (e.g., emotional intelligence) positively with important working life outcomes, such as health, job satisfaction, job performance, organizational commitment, and leadership effectiveness. However, no study has yet described emotional leadership resources based on traits linked with work motivation and stress resilience. The aim was to describe emotional leadership resources based on traits in a novel fashion (meta-traits, based on structural trait analysis). Our hypothesis was that an emotional leadership meta-resource factor would converge with motivation and stress resilience. Participants (N = 344) were leaders aged between 23 and 65 years (M = 49, SD = 8.6; 58% women) who completed an online questionnaire including measures of common traits (e.g., trait emotional intelligence, Big Six), and coping resources. We estimated work motivation by self-rated work engagement, and stress resilience by the level of perceived stress. We used an exploratory factor analysis approach to describe and structure our data, and structural equation modelling (SEM) to test whether an emotional leadership meta-resource factor would converge with work motivation and stress resilience. Our findings revealed that the investigated traits and resources could be described along four broad emotional leadership resource factors, namely (1) Externalizing, (2) Moral goodness, (3) “Destrudo”, and (4) Rational mastery. As expected, the emotional leadership meta-resource factor showed a strong convergence (~.80) with both work motivation and stress resilience. “Externalizing” and “Rational mastery” were the most important emotional resource factors. The findings are discussed using Hobfoll’s motivational Conservation of Resources (COR) theory. It is concluded that common traits, including personality traits, and coping resources comprise an emotional leadership meta-resource factor, which to a high degree converges with work motivation and stress resilience. The results imply that organizations may strengthen work motivation and reduce stress by recruiting leaders possessing valuable emotional leadership resources.

Keywords
Sweden, Leadership, Work Performance, Emotional Intelligence, Personality, Coping Resources, Empathy, Performance-Based Self-Esteem, Work Engagement, Perceived Stress
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
SOCIAL SCIENCE, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-14819 (URN)
Conference
Perpsy19 World Conference on Personality, 2-6 April 2019, Hanoi, Vietnam
Projects
“Det medmänskliga ledarskapet” [The human/charitable leadership]Emotional IntelligenceWork Performance
Available from: 2019-12-27 Created: 2019-12-27 Last updated: 2019-12-30Bibliographically approved
Dåderman, A. M., Hallberg, A., Skog, S. & Kajonius, P. (2019). Emotional Leadership in Relation to Task Performance, Work Engagement, and Perceived Stress. In: Prof. Franco Fraccaroli (Ed.), Working for the greater good: Inspiring people, designing jobs and leading organizations for a more inclusive society. Paper presented at 19th Eawop Congress, 29th May – 1st June 2019, Turin, ITALY. Turin
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Emotional Leadership in Relation to Task Performance, Work Engagement, and Perceived Stress
2019 (English)In: Working for the greater good: Inspiring people, designing jobs and leading organizations for a more inclusive society / [ed] Prof. Franco Fraccaroli, Turin, 2019Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To describe and explore emotional leadership meta-resources based on traits (self-esteem, emotional intelligence, leadership intelligence, empathy, Big Six, narcissism) and coping resources (e.g. cognitive), using Hobfoll’s motivational Conservation of Resources (COR). Our hypothesis was that leadership resources would be positively related to work engagement and negatively to perceived stress.

Methodology: Participants (N = 344) were leaders aged between 23 and 65 years (M = 49, SD = 8.6; 58% women) who completed an online questionnaire including measures of common traits and coping resources. Work engagement was measured by Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES-9; Schaufeli & Bakker, 2004), and stress by Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10; Cohen & Williamson, 1988). We used an exploratory factor analysis approach to describe and structure our data, and structural equation modelling (SEM) to test whether an emotional leadership meta-resource factor would be positively related to work engagement and negatively to perceived stress.

Results: The investigated traits and resources could be described along four broad emotional leadership resource factors: (1) Externalizing; (2) Moral goodness; (3) Destrudo; (4) Rational mastery. As expected, the emotional leadership meta-resource factor showed a strong convergence (~.80) with both work engagement (positively) and perceived stress (negatively). 

Research/Practical Implications: The results imply that organizations may strengthen work engagement and reduce stress by recruiting leaders possessing valuable emotional leadership resources.

Originality/Value: Our study is the first to describe emotional leadership resources based on traits linked with work engagement and perceived stress in a novel fashion (meta-traits, based on structural trait analysis).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Turin: , 2019
Keywords
Swedish Leaders, Emotional Leadership Meta-Resources, COR, Self-Esteem, Emotional Intelligence, Leadership Intelligence, Empathy, HEXACO, Narcissism, Coping Resources, Work-integrated learning
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
SOCIAL SCIENCE, Psychology; Work Integrated Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-14820 (URN)
Conference
19th Eawop Congress, 29th May – 1st June 2019, Turin, ITALY
Available from: 2019-12-27 Created: 2019-12-27 Last updated: 2020-01-16Bibliographically approved
Dåderman, A. M. & Hjalmarsson, A. (2019). Relationship between emotional intelligence, personality and work performance: A cross-sectional study. In: : . Paper presented at Perpsy19 World Conference on Personality, 2-6 April 2019, Hanoi, Vietnam. Hanoi
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Relationship between emotional intelligence, personality and work performance: A cross-sectional study
2019 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The background of this study is the observation that people with high emotional intelligence (EI) perform well at work. The aim of this study was to further validate the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire Short Form (TEIQue-SF) by (1) investigating its relationships with the Mini International Personality Item Pool-6 Inventory (Mini-IPIP6), the Short Dark Triad Assessment (SD3), and the Individual Work Performance Questionnaire (IWPQ), (2) identifying which personality traits best explain variations in trait EI, and (3) investigating whether trait EI can predict variations in each dimension (Task Performance, Contextual Performance, and Counterproductive Work Behavior, CWB) of self-perceived work performance. A cross-sectional study was done with 228 Swedish participants (M = 34 years, SD = 12.6, range 16-71 years, 66% women) with an average work experience of 14 years (SD = 11.5). One expected result was that all dimensions of trait EI correlated negatively with Neuroticism and Machiavellianism, and positively with Extraversion, Agreeableness, Conscientiousness, Openness to Experience, and Narcissism. Self-control and Sociability had, however, almost zero correlation with Machiavellianism. A positive correlation was found between all dimensions of EI and Task Performance and Contextual Performance. Standard regression analyses showed that 26% to 46% of the variation in the different dimensions of EI was explained by the “Big Six” personality traits. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses indicated that trait EI accounted for a significant proportion of the variation in Contextual Performance that was not explained by any of the “Big Six” personality traits, and that trait EI did not explain any variation in CWB above Neuroticism and Honesty-Humility. In addition, trait EI explained an additional 6% of the variation in Task Performance when controlling for gender, age, Neuroticism and Conscientiousness. It is concluded that the Swedish version of the TEIQue-SF has shown reasonable theoretically and empirically grounded relationships with relevant variables for the workplace.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hanoi: , 2019
Keywords
Sweden, Trait Emotional Intelligence (TEIQue-SF), Mini-IPIP6, SD3, IWPQ, Work-integrated Learning
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
SOCIAL SCIENCE, Psychology; Work Integrated Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-14818 (URN)10.13140/RG.2.2.17993.49761 (DOI)
Conference
Perpsy19 World Conference on Personality, 2-6 April 2019, Hanoi, Vietnam
Projects
Emotional IntelligenceWork Performance
Available from: 2019-12-27 Created: 2019-12-27 Last updated: 2020-01-16Bibliographically approved
Basińska, B. A. & Dåderman, A. M. (2019). Work Values of Police Officers and their Relationship with Job Burnout and Work Engagement. Frontiers in Psychology, 10, Article ID 442.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Work Values of Police Officers and their Relationship with Job Burnout and Work Engagement
2019 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 10, article id 442Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Values represent people’s highest priorities and are cognitive representations of basic motivations. Work values determine what is important for employees in their work and what they want to achieve in their work. Past research shows that levels of both aspects of job-related well-being, job burnout and work engagement, are related to work values. The policing profession is associated with high engagement and a risk of burnout. There is a gap in the literature regarding the hierarchy of work values in police officers, how work values are associated with job burnout and work engagement in this group, and whether work values in police officers are sensitive to different levels of job burnout and work engagement. Therefore, the aim of our study was to examine the relationships between work values and job burnout and work engagement, in a group of experienced police officers. We investigated: (a) the hierarchy of work values based on Super’s theory of career development, (b) relationships between work values and burnout and work engagement, and (c) differences between the work values in four groups (burned-out, strained, engaged, and relaxed). A group of 234 Polish police officers completed the Work Values Inventory (WVI) modeled upon Super’s theory, the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory and the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale. The results show that police officers gave the highest priority to extrinsic work values. Job burnout was negatively correlated with the cognitive intrinsic work values (Creativity, Challenge, and Variety), while work engagement was positively correlated with the largest group of intrinsic work values (Creativity, Challenge, Variety, Altruism, and Achievement), as well as with the extrinsic work values (Prestige and Co-workers). The police officers showed significant differences, between levels of job burnout and work engagement, for intrinsic work values such as Variety, Challenge, and Creativity (large effects), and for Altruism and Prestige (moderate effects). The findings are discussed within the context of the Conservation of Resources theory, which explains how people invest and protect their personal resources, and how this is connected with preferred work values. We conclude that intrinsic work values are sensitive to different levels of burnout and engagement.

Keywords
work values, occupational well-being, job burnout, work engagement, Super’s Work Values Inventory, Conservation of Resources theory, police officers
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
Work Integrated Learning; SOCIAL SCIENCE, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-13715 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2019.00442 (DOI)000461125900001 ()30923507 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85065214784 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-03-14 Created: 2019-03-14 Last updated: 2019-05-22Bibliographically approved
Dåderman, A. M. & Ragnestål-Impola, C. (2019). Workplace bullies, not their victims, score high on the Dark Triad and Extraversion, and low on Agreeableness and Honesty-Humility. Heliyon, 5(10), Article ID e02609.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Workplace bullies, not their victims, score high on the Dark Triad and Extraversion, and low on Agreeableness and Honesty-Humility
2019 (English)In: Heliyon, ISSN 2405-8440, Vol. 5, no 10, article id e02609Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Most past research has focused mainly on the personality of the victims of bullying and not on the personality of workplace bullies. Some researchers have suggested that bullies and their victims may share bully-typifying personality traits. The aims of this study were to find out what characterizes the personalities of workplace bullies and their victims, and to investigate the relationship between the Dark Triad, HEXACO and workplace bullying. We tested three hypotheses. H1: Machiavellianism and Psychopathy, but not Narcissism, predict the use of bullying tactics (i.e., bullying perpetration). H2: (Low) Honesty-Humility, (low) Agreeableness and (high) Extraversion predict the use of bullying tactics. H3: Honesty-Humility moderates the association between Machiavellianism and the use of bullying tactics. Employees in southwestern Sweden (N = 172; 99 women) across various occupations and organizations were surveyed. Negative Acts Questionnaire-Perpetrators (NAQ-P) and Negative Acts Questionnaire-Revised (NAQ-R) were used to assess the use of bullying tactics and victimization. NAQ-P was correlated with NAQ-R (r = .27), indicating some overlap between the use of bullying tactics and victimization. NAQ-P was correlated with Machiavellianism (.60), Psychopathy (.58), Narcissism (.54), Agreeableness (-.34), Honesty-Humility (-.29) and Extraversion (.28). The results of linear regressions confirmed H1, but only partially confirmed H2: Machiavellianism, Psychopathy, (low) Agreeableness and (high) Extraversion explained 32%, 25%, 27% and 19%, respectively, of the variation in the NAQ-P. Replicating past research, NAQ-R was correlated with Neuroticism (.27), Extraversion (-.22), Openness (-.19) and Conscientiousness (-.16). Neuroticism explained 25% and (low) Extraversion 17% of the variation in the NAQ-R. Confirming H3, Honesty-Humility moderated the relationship between the NAQ-P and Machiavellianism. We conclude that bullies, but not their victims, are callous, manipulative, extravert and disagreeable, and that dishonest Machiavellians are the biggest bullies of all. In practice, the victims of workplace bullying need strong and supportive leadership to protect them from bullies with exploitative and manipulative personality profiles.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Quality of life Occupational health Pathology Diagnostics Psychology Workplace bullying The bullied and the bully Dark Triad HEXACO NAQ-R NAQ-P SD3 MiniIPIP-6
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
SOCIAL SCIENCE, Psychology; Work Integrated Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-14592 (URN)10.1016/j.heliyon.2019.e02609 (DOI)2-s2.0-85073011634 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-10-15 Created: 2019-10-15 Last updated: 2020-01-10Bibliographically approved
Iseland, T., Johansson, E., Skoog, S. & Dåderman, A. M. (2018). An exploratory study of long-haul truck drivers' secondary tasks and reasons for performing them.. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 117, 154-163, Article ID S0001-4575(18)30149-0.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An exploratory study of long-haul truck drivers' secondary tasks and reasons for performing them.
2018 (English)In: Accident Analysis and Prevention, ISSN 0001-4575, E-ISSN 1879-2057, Vol. 117, p. 154-163, article id S0001-4575(18)30149-0Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Research on drivers has shown how certain visual-manual secondary tasks, unrelated to driving, increase the risk of being involved in crashes. The purpose of the study was to investigate (1) if long-haul truck drivers in Sweden engage in secondary tasks while driving, what tasks are performed and how frequently, (2) the drivers' self-perceived reason/s for performing them, and (3) if psychological factors might reveal reasons for their engaging in secondary tasks. The study comprised 13 long-haul truck drivers and was conducted through observations, interviews, and questionnaires. The drivers performed secondary tasks, such as work environment related "necessities" (e.g., getting food and/or beverages from the refrigerator/bag, eating, drinking, removing a jacket, face rubbing, and adjusting the seat), interacting with a mobile phone/in-truck technology, and doing administrative tasks. The long-haul truck drivers feel bored and use secondary tasks as a coping strategy to alleviate boredom/drowsiness, and for social interaction. The higher number of performed secondary tasks could be explained by lower age, shorter driver experience, less openness to experience, lower honesty-humility, lower perceived stress, lower workload, and by higher health-related quality of life. These explanatory results may serve as a starting point for further studies on large samples to develop a safer and healthier environment for long-haul truck drivers.

Keywords
Health-related quality of life, Long-haul truck drivers, Perceived stress, Personality traits, Secondary tasks, Workload
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
SOCIAL SCIENCE, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-12273 (URN)10.1016/j.aap.2018.04.010 (DOI)000436888400017 ()29702333 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85046157794 (Scopus ID)
Funder
VINNOVA, D2016-04263
Note

Funders:  Volvo Group Trucks Technology, D2016-04263 

Available from: 2018-04-30 Created: 2018-04-30 Last updated: 2019-02-05Bibliographically approved
Basinska, B. A. & Dåderman, A. M. (2018). Be fearless : Positive affect as a mediator between venturesomeness and self-efficacy in future entrepreneurs and managers: Être intrépide : affect positif agissant comme médiateur entre l’audace et la connaissance de ses propres capacités chez les futurs entrepreneurs et managers. Revue Européenne de Psychologie Appliquée / European Review of Applied Psychology, 68(4-5), 171-180
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Be fearless : Positive affect as a mediator between venturesomeness and self-efficacy in future entrepreneurs and managers: Être intrépide : affect positif agissant comme médiateur entre l’audace et la connaissance de ses propres capacités chez les futurs entrepreneurs et managers
2018 (English)In: Revue Européenne de Psychologie Appliquée / European Review of Applied Psychology, ISSN 1162-9088, Vol. 68, no 4-5, p. 171-180Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction and objectives. – Self-efficacy, personality and different affect states in entrepreneurs and managers are important factors for effectiveness and well-being. The aim of the study was to examine in young adults during entrepreneurship-related education, the relationships between venturesomeness and self-efficacy, and the mediating effects of positive affect and positive emotions (joviality, self-assurance, attentiveness) on these relationships.

Method. – One hundred and fifty-three participants (mean age 22 years) completed questionnaires that assessed venturesomeness, general self-efficacy, positive affect (measured as a state), and positive emotions. Bootstrapping analyses with simple and multiple mediators were conducted, controlled for gender, to estimate the indirect effects of positive affect and positive emotions on venturesomeness and general self-efficacy.

Results. – Venturesomeness was significantly correlated with self-efficacy. Positive affect (model 1), joviality and self-assurance, but not attentiveness (model 2), were complete mediators in the relationship between venturesomeness and self-efficacy.

Conclusion. – The present study provides new evidence that heightened venturesomeness is related to higher levels of positive affect, self-assurance and joviality. Venturesomeness, therefore, may strengthen self-efficacy in young people during entrepreneurship-related education, and positive emotions may lead to an aware use of resources, including self-efficacy. These results may stimulate young people to be braveand to try new experiences.

Abstract [fr]

Introduction et objectifs

La connaissance de ses propres capacités, la personnalité et les différents états d’affect chez les entrepreneurs et les managers sont des facteurs importants en ce qui concerne l’efficacité et le bien-être. L’objectif de cette étude consistait à examiner de jeunes adultes lors d’une formation liée à l’entrepreneuriat, les relations entre l’audace et la connaissance de ses propres capacités, et les effets médiateurs de l’affect positif et des émotions positives (jovialité, confiance en soi, sollicitude) sur ces relations.

Méthode

Cent cinquante-trois participants (âge moyen 22 ans) ont rempli des questionnaires évaluant l’audace, la connaissance générale de ses propres capacités, l’affect positif (mesuré comme un état) et les émotions positives. Des analyses de démarrage avec des médiateurs simples et multiples ont été réalisées, contrôlées pour le sexe, en vue d’estimer les effets indirects de l’affect positif et des émotions positives sur l’audace et la connaissance générale de ses propres capacités.

Résultats

L’audace a été corrélée de manière significative à la connaissance de ses propres capacités. L’affect positif (modèle 1), la jovialité et la confiance en soi, mais pas la sollicitude (modèle 2), étaient des médiateurs complets dans la relation entre l’audace et la connaissance de ses propres capacités.

Conclusion

Cette étude apporte une nouvelle preuve que l’intensification de l’audace est liée à des niveaux supérieurs d’affect positif, de confiance en soi et de jovialité. Par conséquent, l’audace peut renforcer la connaissance de ses propres capacités chez les jeunes gens pendant une formation liée à l’entrepreneuriat, et les émotions positives peuvent entraîner une utilisation consciente des ressources, notamment de la confiance en soi. Ces résultats peuvent stimuler les jeunes gens à faire preuve de courage et tenter de nouvelles expériences.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Venturesomeness, Positive affect, Self-assurance, Joviality, Attentiveness, Self-efficacy, Entrepreneurship, Mediation, Young adults, Audace, Affect positif, Confiance en soi, Jovialité, Sollicitude, Connaissance de ses propres capacités, Entrepreneuriat, Médiation, Jeunes adultesr
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
SOCIAL SCIENCE, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-13111 (URN)10.1016/j.erap.2018.08.001 (DOI)000455288300003 ()2-s2.0-85051993230 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Studies on self-esteem, self-efficacy, personality, and different states in young adults during their entrepreneurship-related education” (Ref. no.2013/704 B22)
Note

Funders: Gdansk University of Technology

Available from: 2018-11-10 Created: 2018-11-10 Last updated: 2019-05-27Bibliographically approved
Dåderman, A. M. & Hellström, Å. (2018). Interrater Reliability of Psychopathy Checklist-Revised: Results on Multiple Analysis Levels for a Sample of Patients Undergoing Forensic Psychiatric Evaluation. Criminal justice and behavior, 45(2), 234-263
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interrater Reliability of Psychopathy Checklist-Revised: Results on Multiple Analysis Levels for a Sample of Patients Undergoing Forensic Psychiatric Evaluation
2018 (English)In: Criminal justice and behavior, ISSN 0093-8548, E-ISSN 1552-3594, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 234-263Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Scores from the Psychopathy Checklist–Revised (PCL-R) are used to support decisions regarding personal liberty. In our study, performed in an applied forensic psychiatric setting, intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) for absolute agreement, single rater (ICCA1) were .89 for the total score, .82 for Factor 1, .88 for Factor 2, and .78 to .86 for the four facets. These results stand in contrast to lower reliabilities found in a majority of field studies. Disagreement among raters made a low contribution (0%-5%) to variability of scores on the total score, factor, and facet level. For individual items, ICCA1 varied from .38 to .94, with >.80 for seven of the 20 items. Items 17 (“Many short-term marital relationships”) and 19 (“Revocation of conditional release”) showed very low reliabilities (.38 and .43, respectively). The importance of knowledge about factors that can affect scoring of forensic instruments (e.g., education, training, experience, motivation, raters’ personality, and quality of file data) is emphasized.

Keywords
PCL-R, interrater reliability, separate interview data, generalizability theory, Swedish forensic psychiatric patients
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
SOCIAL SCIENCE, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-11999 (URN)10.1177/0093854817747647 (DOI)000419691200005 ()2-s2.0-85040353412 (Scopus ID)
Funder
The Karolinska Institutet's Research FoundationStiftelsen Söderström - Königska sjukhemmet
Note

Article first published online: January 9, 2018

Funders: The Swedish Carnegie Institute; The Swedish Foundation for Care Sciences and Allergy Research; The Swedish National Board of Forensic Medicine (Rättsmedicinalverket)

Available from: 2018-01-15 Created: 2018-01-15 Last updated: 2019-05-28Bibliographically approved
Dåderman, A. M. & Basinska, B. A. (2018). Job Demands, Engagement, and Turnover Intentions in Polish Nurses: The Role of Work-Family Interface (1ed.). In: Renato Pisanti, James Campbell Quick, Montgomery Anthony (Ed.), Psychosocial job dimensions and distress/well-being: issues and challenges in occupational health psychology (pp. 91-104). Frontiers Media S.A.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Job Demands, Engagement, and Turnover Intentions in Polish Nurses: The Role of Work-Family Interface
2018 (English)In: Psychosocial job dimensions and distress/well-being: issues and challenges in occupational health psychology / [ed] Renato Pisanti, James Campbell Quick, Montgomery Anthony, Frontiers Media S.A., 2018, 1, p. 91-104Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Background:

Poland has lower ratios of employed registered nurses per 1,000 inhabitants than the EU average. Polish nurses work under miserable conditions without assisting personnel, and they reconcile their professional demands with responsibilities for their families; 96% of them are women.

Rationale/Aims:

This study uses Hobfoll's conservation of resources (CORs) theory to explain the role of various resources in the improvement of work conditions in the nursing profession. Work-family conflict (WFC) and family work conflict (FWC) threaten to deplete nurses' resources. This paper set out to (1) examine the extent to which perceived job demands (workload and interpersonal conflicts at work) and engagement (vigor, dedication, and absorption) are associated with turnover intentions (the intention to leave the present workplace and the intention to leave the nursing profession); (2) attempt to determine whether levels of WFC and FWC moderate these associations.

Design/Method:

This study comprised 188 female registered nurses. The inclusion criterion was to live with a partner and/or have children.

Results:

WFC was moderately related to FWC. Hierarchical regression analyses showed that only high job demands and low vigor were significantly associated with turnover intentions. WFC was experienced more intensively than FWC. Job demands, vigor, dedication, and turnover intentions had a strong effect on WFC, while absorption had a strong effect on FWC. However, levels of WFC and FWC did not significantly moderate these associations.

Originality/Conclusion:

The study produces new knowledge by examining a constellation of job demands, work engagement and WFC, which reflect the management of personal resources. Results from such a constellation in nurses from countries with a post-transformational economic system have not previously been discussed in the light of COR theory. Most importantly, we conclude that WFC does not intensify turnover intentions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2018 Edition: 1
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
SOCIAL SCIENCE, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-12059 (URN)10.3389/978-2-88945-408-2 (DOI)978-2-88945-408-2 (ISBN)
Note

Specialty section: This article was submitted to Organizational Psychology, a section of the journal Frontiers in Psychology, 7:1621. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2016.01621

Available from: 2018-02-05 Created: 2018-02-05 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Kajonius, P. & Dåderman, A. M. (2017). Conceptualizations of Personality Disorders with the Five Factor Model-count and Empathy Traits. International Journal of Testing, 17(2), 141-157
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conceptualizations of Personality Disorders with the Five Factor Model-count and Empathy Traits
2017 (English)In: International Journal of Testing, ISSN 1530-5058, E-ISSN 1532-7574, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 141-157Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Previous research has long advocated that emotional and behavioral disorders are related to general personality traits, such as the Five Factor Model (FFM). The addition of section III in the latest Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) recommends that extremity in personality traits together with maladaptive interpersonal functioning, such as lack of empathy, are used for identifying psychopathology and particularly personality disorders (PD). The objective of the present study was to measure dispositions for DSM categories based on normal personality continuums, and to conceptualize these with empathy traits. We used a validated FFM-count method based on the five personality factors (neuroticism, extraversion, openness, agreeableness, and conscientiousness), and related these to 4 empathy traits (emphatic concern, perspective-taking, fantasy, and personal distress). The results showed that FFM-based PD scores overall could be conceptualized using only two of the empathy traits, low emphatic concern and high personal distress. Further, specific dispositions for personality disorders were characterized with distinct empathy traits (e.g., histrionic with high fantasy, and paranoid with low perspective-taking). These findings may have both theoretical and practical implications in capturing potential for personality disorders with ease and efficiency. © 2017, Copyright © International Test Commission.

National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
SOCIAL SCIENCE, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-11595 (URN)10.1080/15305058.2017.1279164 (DOI)000402241300003 ()2-s2.0-85011277383 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-09-20 Created: 2017-09-20 Last updated: 2019-12-05Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8562-5610

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