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Kapetanovic, S., Rothenberg, W. A., Lansford, J. E., Bornstein, M. H., Chang, L., Deater-Deckard, K., . . . Bacchini, D. (2020). Cross-Cultural Examination of Links between Parent-Adolescent Communication and Adolescent Psychological Problems in 12 Cultural Groups.. Journal of Youth and Adolescence
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cross-Cultural Examination of Links between Parent-Adolescent Communication and Adolescent Psychological Problems in 12 Cultural Groups.
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2020 (English)In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, ISSN 0047-2891, E-ISSN 1573-6601Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Internalizing and externalizing problems increase during adolescence. However, these problems may be mitigated by adequate parenting, including effective parent-adolescent communication. The ways in which parent-driven (i.e., parent behavior control and solicitation) and adolescent-driven (i.e., disclosure and secrecy) communication efforts are linked to adolescent psychological problems universally and cross-culturally is a question that needs more empirical investigation. The current study used a sample of 1087 adolescents (M = 13.19 years, SD = 0.90, 50% girls) from 12 cultural groups in nine countries including China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and the United States to test the cultural moderation of links between parent solicitation, parent behavior control, adolescent disclosure, and adolescent secrecy with adolescent internalizing and externalizing problems. The results indicate that adolescent-driven communication, and secrecy in particular, is intertwined with adolescents' externalizing problems across all cultures, and intertwined with internalizing problems in specific cultural contexts. Moreover, parent-driven communication efforts were predicted by adolescent disclosure in all cultures. Overall, the findings suggest that adolescent-driven communication efforts, and adolescent secrecy in particular, are important predictors of adolescent psychological problems as well as facilitators of parent-adolescent communication.

Keywords
Adolescent secrecy, Parent-adolescent communication, Psychological problems, Universal parenting
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Child and Youth studies; SOCIAL SCIENCE, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-15060 (URN)10.1007/s10964-020-01212-2 (DOI)32166654 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85081934369& (Scopus ID)
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 695300-HKADeC-ERC-2015-Ad
Note

Funders: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Developmen(RO1-HD054805 & P2CHD065563);National Institute on Drug Abuse(P30 DA023026);

Available from: 2020-03-16 Created: 2020-03-16 Last updated: 2020-04-06Bibliographically approved
Rothenberg, W. A., Lansford, J. E., Al-Hassan, S. M., Bacchini, D., Bornstein, M. H., Chang, L., . . . Peña Alampay, L. (2020). Examining effects of parent warmth and control on internalizing behavior clusters from age 8 to 12 in 12 cultural groups in nine countries. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines, 61(4), 436-446
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Examining effects of parent warmth and control on internalizing behavior clusters from age 8 to 12 in 12 cultural groups in nine countries
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2020 (English)In: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines, ISSN 0021-9630, E-ISSN 1469-7610, Vol. 61, no 4, p. 436-446Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Studies of U.S. and European samples demonstrate that parental warmth and behavioral control predict child internalizing behaviors and vice versa. However, these patterns have not been researched in other cultures. This study investigates associations between parent warmth and control and three child-reported internalizing behavior clusters to examine this question.

METHODS: Data from 12 cultural groups in 9 countries were used to investigate prospective bidirectional associations between parental warmth and control, and three child-reported internalizing behavior types: withdrawn/depressed, anxious/depressed, and somatic problems. Multiple-group structural equation modeling was used to analyze associations in children followed from ages 8 to 12.

RESULTS: Parent warmth and control effects were most pervasive on child-reported withdrawn/depressed problems, somewhat pervasive on anxious/depressed problems and least pervasive on somatic problems. Additionally, parental warmth, as opposed to control, was more consistently associated with child-reported internalizing problems across behavior clusters. Child internalizing behavior effects on parental warmth and control appeared ubiquitously across cultures, and behaviors, but were limited to ages 8-10. Most effects were pancultural, but culture-specific effects emerged at ages 9-10 involving the associations between parent warmth and withdrawn/depressed and somatic behaviors.

CONCLUSIONS: Effects of parent warmth and control appear stronger on some types of child-reported internalizing behaviors. Associations are especially strong with regard to parental warmth across cultures, and culture-specific effects may be accounted for by cultural normativeness of parent warmth and child-reported somatic symptoms. Child internalizing behavior effects on subsequent parenting are common across cultures.

Keywords
Warmth, control, cross-cultural, internalizing behaviors, parenting
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology) Psychiatry
Research subject
SOCIAL SCIENCE, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-14683 (URN)10.1111/jcpp.13138 (DOI)000519592500005 ()31667849 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85074717038 (Scopus ID)
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 695300‐HKADeC‐ERC‐2015‐AdG
Note

Funders: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development grant RO1‐HD054805;Fogarty International Center grant RO3‐TW008141;, National Institute on Drug Abuse grant P30 DA023026, the NIH/NICHD Intramural Research Program

Available from: 2019-11-14 Created: 2019-11-14 Last updated: 2020-04-02Bibliographically approved
Rothenberg, W. A., Lansford, J. E., Chang, L., Deater-Deckard, K., Di Giunta, L., Dodge, K. A., . . . Bornstein, M. H. (2020). Examining the internalizing pathway to substance use frequency in 10 cultural groups.. Addictive Behaviours, 102, Article ID 106214.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Examining the internalizing pathway to substance use frequency in 10 cultural groups.
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2020 (English)In: Addictive Behaviours, ISSN 0306-4603, E-ISSN 1873-6327, Vol. 102, article id 106214Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Use of alcohol, tobacco, and drugs (i.e., substance use) is a leading cause of global health burden for 10-to-24-year-olds, according to the World Health Organization's index of number of years of life lost, leading international health organizations to prioritize the prevention of substance use before it escalates in adolescence. Pathways defined by childhood externalizing symptoms and internalizing symptoms identify precursors to frequent substance use toward which interventions can be directed. However, these pathways are rarely examined beyond the United States and Europe. We investigated these pathways in our sample of 1083 children from 10 cultural groups followed from ages 8-14. We found that age-10 externalizing symptoms predicted more frequent mother-reported age-13 and self-reported age-14 substance use. We also found that a depressive pathway, marked by behavioral inhibition at age 8 and subsequent elevation in depressive symptoms across ages 8-12 predicted more frequent substance use at age 13 and 14. Additionally, we found a combined externalizing and internalizing pathway, wherein elevated age-9 depressive symptoms predicted elevated externalizing symptoms at age-10 which predicted greater peer support for use at age-12, which led to more frequent substance use at age-13 and -14. These pathways remained significant within the cultural groups we studied, even after controlling for differences in substance use frequency across groups. Additionally, cultures with greater opportunities for substance use at age-12 had more frequent adolescent substance use at age-13. These findings highlight the importance of disaggregating between- and within-culture effects in identifying the etiology of early adolescent substance use.

Keywords
Adolescence, Cultural differences, Externalizing symptoms, Internalizing pathway, Multilevel, Substance use frequency
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
SOCIAL SCIENCE, Psychology; Child and Youth studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-14751 (URN)10.1016/j.addbeh.2019.106214 (DOI)000508761500029 ()31809879 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85075793311 (Scopus ID)
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 695300-HKADeC-ERC-2015-AdG
Note

Funders: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (RO1-HD054805);Fogarty International Center (RO3-TW008141);NIH/NICHD, USA

Available from: 2019-12-11 Created: 2019-12-11 Last updated: 2020-02-27Bibliographically approved
Di Giunta, L., Rothenberg, W. A., Lunetti, C., Lansford, J. E., Pastorelli, C., Eisenberg, N., . . . Uribe Tirado, L. M. (2020). Longitudinal associations between mothers' and fathers' anger/irritability expressiveness, harsh parenting, and adolescents' socioemotional functioning in nine countries.. Developmental Psychology, 56(3), 458-474
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Longitudinal associations between mothers' and fathers' anger/irritability expressiveness, harsh parenting, and adolescents' socioemotional functioning in nine countries.
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2020 (English)In: Developmental Psychology, ISSN 0012-1649, E-ISSN 1939-0599, Vol. 56, no 3, p. 458-474Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present study examines parents' self-efficacy about anger regulation and irritability as predictors of harsh parenting and adolescent children's irritability (i.e., mediators), which in turn were examined as predictors of adolescents' externalizing and internalizing problems. Mothers, fathers, and adolescents (N = 1,298 families) from 12 cultural groups in 9 countries (China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and United States) were interviewed when children were about 13 years old and again 1 and 2 years later. Models were examined separately for mothers and fathers. Overall, cross-cultural similarities emerged in the associations of both mothers' and fathers' irritability, as well as of mothers' self-efficacy about anger regulation, with subsequent maternal harsh parenting and adolescent irritability, and in the associations of the latter variables with adolescents' internalizing and externalizing problems. The findings suggest that processes linking mothers' and fathers' emotion socialization and emotionality in diverse cultures to adolescent problem behaviors are somewhat similar. 

Keywords
adolescents, children, irritability
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
SOCIAL SCIENCE, Psychology; Child and Youth studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-15023 (URN)10.1037/dev0000849 (DOI)000516578800007 ()32077717 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85081143499 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-02-26 Created: 2020-02-26 Last updated: 2020-04-09Bibliographically approved
Ryding, J. & Sorbring, E. (2020). Ny förståelse för forskningsbaserade modeller i familjebehandlande socialt arbete. Barnbladet, XLVI(1), 12-16
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ny förståelse för forskningsbaserade modeller i familjebehandlande socialt arbete
2020 (Swedish)In: Barnbladet, ISSN 0349-1994, Vol. XLVI, no 1, p. 12-16Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [sv]

Evidensbaserad praktik (EBP) har sedan 2000-talet fått en ökad användningsgrad inom människorelaterade yrken, t ex inom verksamheter såsom elevhälsan och socialtjänsten, vars professioner uppmuntras till att arbeta evidensbaserat för att höja graden av kunskapsanvändning och kunskapsutvecklinginom fältet.I den här artikeln kommer vi att beskriva hur förståelsen,inställningen och kunskapen kring EBP och dess relaterade arbetssätt är i stort behov av att problematiseras, då dessa inte sällan bygger på förutfattade meningar och okunskap, vilket i sin tur har resulterat i ett för EBP oförtjänt rykte.

National Category
Social Work
Research subject
SOCIAL SCIENCE, Social work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-14988 (URN)
Available from: 2020-02-21 Created: 2020-02-21 Last updated: 2020-02-21
Icenogle, G., Steinberg, L., Duell, N., Chein, J., Chang, L., Chaudhary, N., . . . Bacchini, D. (2019). Adolescents’ cognitive capacity reaches adult levels prior to their psychosocial maturity: Evidence for a "maturity gap" in a multinational, cross-sectional sample. Law and human behavior, 43(1), 69-85
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adolescents’ cognitive capacity reaches adult levels prior to their psychosocial maturity: Evidence for a "maturity gap" in a multinational, cross-sectional sample
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2019 (English)In: Law and human behavior, ISSN 0147-7307, E-ISSN 1573-661X, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 69-85Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

All countries distinguish between minors and adults for various legal purposes. Recent U.S. Supreme Court cases concerning the legal status of juveniles have consulted psychological science to decide where to draw these boundaries. However, little is known about the robustness of the relevant research, because it has been conducted largely in the U.S. and other Western countries. To the extent that lawmakers look to research to guide their decisions, it is important to know how generalizable the scientific conclusions are. The present study examines 2 psychological phenomena relevant to legal questions about adolescent maturity: cognitive capacity, which undergirds logical thinking, and psychosocial maturity, which comprises individuals' ability to restrain themselves in the face of emotional, exciting, or risky stimuli. Age patterns of these constructs were assessed in 5,227 individuals (50.7% female), ages 10-30 (M = 17.05, SD = 5.91) from 11 countries. Importantly, whereas cognitive capacity reached adult levels around age 16, psychosocial maturity reached adult levels beyond age 18, creating a "maturity gap" between cognitive and psychosocial development. Juveniles may be capable of deliberative decision making by age 16, but even young adults may demonstrate "immature" decision making in arousing situations. We argue it is therefore reasonable to have different age boundaries for different legal purposes: 1 for matters in which cognitive capacity predominates, and a later 1 for matters in which psychosocial maturity plays a substantial role. © 2019 American Psychological Association.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Psychological Association (APA), 2019
Keywords
Law, juveniles, legal status
National Category
Law and Society Psychology
Research subject
SOCIAL SCIENCE, Psychology; Child and Youth studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-13743 (URN)10.1037/lhb0000315 (DOI)2-s2.0-85061617264 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funders: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, RO1-HD054805

Available from: 2019-03-21 Created: 2019-03-21 Last updated: 2019-12-10Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, L. A. & Sorbring, E. (2019). Att forska i samverkan och gemensamt skapa kunskap. In: Lena Nilsson & Emma Sorbring (red.) (Ed.), Samverkansforskning: att främja barns och ungas välfärd (pp. 19-24). Stockholm: Liber
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Att forska i samverkan och gemensamt skapa kunskap
2019 (Swedish)In: Samverkansforskning: att främja barns och ungas välfärd / [ed] Lena Nilsson & Emma Sorbring (red.), Stockholm: Liber, 2019, p. 19-24Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Liber, 2019
Keywords
Forskning, samarbete, kunskapsteori
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Child and Youth studies; NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Public health science; SOCIAL SCIENCE, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-13457 (URN)9789147127009 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-02-07 Created: 2019-02-07 Last updated: 2019-12-10Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, L. A. & Sorbring, E. (2019). Barns och ungas välfärd och ett kunskapsbaserat arbetssätt. In: Lena Nilsson & Emma Sorbring (red.) (Ed.), Samverkansforskning: att främja barns och ungas välfärd (pp. 25-28). Stockholm: Liber
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Barns och ungas välfärd och ett kunskapsbaserat arbetssätt
2019 (Swedish)In: Samverkansforskning: att främja barns och ungas välfärd / [ed] Lena Nilsson & Emma Sorbring (red.), Stockholm: Liber, 2019, p. 25-28Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Liber, 2019
Keywords
Välfärd, barn, ungdomsforskning
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Child and Youth studies; NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Public health science; SOCIAL SCIENCE, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-13458 (URN)978-91-47-12700-9 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-02-07 Created: 2019-02-07 Last updated: 2019-12-10Bibliographically approved
Deater-Deckard, K., Godwin, J., Lansford, J. E., Tirado, L. M., Yotanyamaneewong, S., Alampay, L. P., . . . Tapanya, S. (2019). Chaos, Danger, and Maternal Parenting in Families: Links with Adolescent Adjustment in Low- and Middle-Income Countries. Developmental Science, 22(5), Article ID e12855.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chaos, Danger, and Maternal Parenting in Families: Links with Adolescent Adjustment in Low- and Middle-Income Countries
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2019 (English)In: Developmental Science, ISSN 1363-755X, E-ISSN 1467-7687, Vol. 22, no 5, article id e12855Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The current longitudinal study is the first comparative investigation across Low- and Middle- Income Countries (LMICs) to test the hypothesis that harsher and less affectionate maternal parenting (child age 14 years, on average) statistically mediates the prediction from prior household chaos and neighborhood danger (at 13 years) to subsequent adolescent maladjustment (externalizing, internalizing, and school performance problems at 15 years). The sample included 511 urban families in six LMICs: China, Colombia, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines, and Thailand. Multigroup structural equation modeling showed consistent associations between chaos, danger, affectionate and harsh parenting, and adolescent adjustment problems. There was some support for the hypothesis, with nearly all countries showing a modest indirect effect of maternal hostility (but not affection) for adolescent externalizing, internalizing, and scholastic problems. Results provide further evidence that chaotic home and dangerous neighborhood environments increase risk for adolescent maladjustment in LMIC contexts, via harsher maternal parenting. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Keywords
low-income and middle-income countries, adolescence, internalizing, externalizing, academic achievement, parenting
National Category
Psychiatry Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
SOCIAL SCIENCE, Psychology; Child and Youth studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-13859 (URN)10.1111/desc.12855 (DOI)000483697700008 ()2-s2.0-85066500076 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-05-16 Created: 2019-05-16 Last updated: 2020-01-27Bibliographically approved
Sorbring, E. & Kuczynski, L. (2019). Children´s agency in the family, in school and in society: implications for health and well-being. International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, 13(sup 1 Equal Health), Article ID 1634414.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Children´s agency in the family, in school and in society: implications for health and well-being
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 13, no sup 1 Equal Health, article id 1634414Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor and Francis Ltd., 2019
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
SOCIAL SCIENCE, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-14711 (URN)10.1080/17482631.2019.1634414 (DOI)2-s2.0-85073162778 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-11-14 Created: 2019-11-14 Last updated: 2020-01-08Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3328-6538

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